Cabinet damping material

Discussion in 'High Efficiency' started by Salectric, Feb 10, 2018.

  1. I will post some pictures after I get my Jensen/Altec speakers running again, but that won’t be for a couple weeks since I need to get the woofers back.
     
  2. Celt

    Celt Forever Plaid

    That was the way to do it back then...and with a good reason...
     
  3. dowto1000

    dowto1000 Junior Member

    Hi Salectric,

    I liked your post, thanks for sharing. The 825 VOTT ( early ) boxes I run are also only 5/8 ths thick. Dennis advised me NOT to re-make them using one inch Baltic Birch.

    He specifically told me to do a single 2 by 2 inch pine internal brace, on each left and right side wall, covered with see-through Batting , NO cross bracing ( across - L. to R .) wanted in the speaker, and leave the thin stock ALTEC woofer horn flares totally stock.

    He tells me that this mass loading I did carefully, incrementally by ear ( 400 pounds of patio pavers, on each 825 enclosure) will be bettered..... by just doing the minimal bracing of the stock 825 enclosure. Dennis says, all the excess mass I added " takes the FUN " out of the presentation, deadens it too much.

    He also was very specific, for me to get the 825 / VOTT box off the floor, either on industrial casters, or a speaker stand, or cheapo bricks, .... as this also sounds best to him. He said, I had to place the box on the floor, when I was mass loading, but once I remove the mass-loading weight, having the A7s " off the floor" will be the most lively and fun to hear.

    There are similarities between what you report, and where I plan to go !! Interesting for to me to hear this, and not have to do all the experimental work.

    These posts may help others.

    Have a lovely day !!

    Dowto1000
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018
  4. Funny coincidence. I just read Herb Reichert’s review of a KEF speaker in the latest Stereophile and Herb talks about cabinet walls and damping. He says “To my ears, dense, highly damped boxes and/or steep sloped crossovers can sound subliminally thick and restrained. In contrast lightly damped boxes with first-order crossovers add some loose, not-so-subliminal noise to the midrange—-but they can also jump, sound expansive, and dance like Fred and Ginger.”

    While I wouldn’t have used the same words, Herb is describing basically the same things described in this thread.
     

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