A New Turntable Restoration Project - B&O Beogram 8002

I have no idea how this thread will go, if I'll be successful or not. or if I'll make it to the finish line. But, hey... ya gotta start someplace. A buddy gave me a Bang & Olufsen Beogram 8002 Automatic Turntable yesterday.

It's a basket case. As best I can tell these were made between about 1982 and 1987, so that makes it a whopping 34 years old at best, yet possibly as old as 39! There's nothing automatic about this thing. Lights up sort of. Lights up better if it's left on for a bit. Platter motor starts maybe, but stops almost immediately. I get a little more spin from the Turn button, but not enough to get excited about. The arms start to move, but then quickly quit and stay parked. Plinth is in good shape, but the dust cover has some scratches. Platter has some kinda goo on it that doesn't dissolve with alcohol. Opened it up and the carriage servo motor belt is toast. The belt fits about as well as the elastic waist band on a pair of 40 year old chonies. The worm gear is coated in dried out hardened grease. Every piece of double back tape holding the garage door, the aluminum platter surround or anything else it was used to secure has failed. In other words... this thing is a mess!

Is there anything good? YES! There is one good thing. It sports an MMC1 cartridge, which from what I've read would have been the top of the line at the time. No idea if it works, or if it is damaged or not.

I found a place in Denmark that sells a capacitor kit. Apparently fried caps are a primary cause of a sick 8002. They also sell the belts and other stuff. It's not stupid expensive, so I think I'm gonna give it a go. I've been able to locate the user and the service manuals, so that's helpful. There are a few videos too. This thing is very 80's looking. Looks like an Atari game console. My wife hates it. I like it. Well see if I can get anywhere with it. If I can make it work I think I'll give it to my kid to go with his Jolida 202a and his Meadowlarks. Yes, I've created the next generation of Meadowlark fan boi. Quite happy about it too. :)
 
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fiddlefye

Senior Member
They're really pretty cool tables, if a bit persnickety in their old age. Works of art, that is for sure. A well-heeled girlfriend in the early 80s had a complete system with the table etc. and it really sounded quite good and was fun to use. It had a sort of rubber strip for turning the volume up and down as I recall.
 
@fiddlefye It is a really interesting looking TT. Kinda like mid-century. Looks like it wants to be modern, yet you can pretty much pin point the decade it was made. I like too. 👍

I ordered the capacitor set today, the belt, rubber toes for the front edge of the dust cover, industrial double sided tape, and polishing creams for the dust cover. I'm still under a $100 so far, so that's good. I'll dive into the caps once they arrive. I've gotta take some pictures of the double sided tape positions on the platter surround and other areas before I remove the residue. That piece is easy because it's aluminum. The tape residue on plastic parts is going to be a bit more challenging. Can't use acetone or heat, yet alcohol is going to take forever. I've gotta google removing old adhesive from plastic and see what pops up. Then more more pictures before I start to disassemble the circuit boards that get the new caps. Then more pictures and disassemble the arm assembly so I can get at the worm gear. That thing is nasty. Looks 100 years old. Oh dang, just remembered I need to order some braided solder wick. I have a solder sucker, but I'd like to try the wick instead.
 

GuyK

Junior Member
@fiddlefye It is a really interesting looking TT. Kinda like mid-century. Looks like it wants to be modern, yet you can pretty much pin point the decade it was made. I like too. 👍

I ordered the capacitor set today, the belt, rubber toes for the front edge of the dust cover, industrial double sided tape, and polishing creams for the dust cover. I'm still under a $100 so far, so that's good. I'll dive into the caps once they arrive. I've gotta take some pictures of the double sided tape positions on the platter surround and other areas before I remove the residue. That piece is easy because it's aluminum. The tape residue on plastic parts is going to be a bit more challenging. Can't use acetone or heat, yet alcohol is going to take forever. I've gotta google removing old adhesive from plastic and see what pops up. Then more more pictures before I start to disassemble the circuit boards that get the new caps. Then more pictures and disassemble the arm assembly so I can get at the worm gear. That thing is nasty. Looks 100 years old. Oh dang, just remembered I need to order some braided solder wick. I have a solder sucker, but I'd like to try the wick instead.
I've often successfully used naptha/ lighter fluid for removing tape residue from plastics. Don't know about a dustcover, though.
 
As funny as it sounds, Goo B Gone seems to work pretty good on residues like that. Put some on it and let it sit before wiping it off.

The MCM fan in me likes B&O stuff. Should be well worth the effort with that MMC1. I've got a nice TX2 with a MMC that I had retipped to something more like an MMC2 or 3.

I hope you took pre photos. Lets see them
 

Thermionics

Post Whore In Training
I have no idea how this thread will go, if I'll be successful or not. or if I'll make it to the finish line. But, hey... ya gotta start someplace. A buddy gave me a Bang & Olufsen Beogram 8002 Automatic Turntable yesterday.

It's a basket case. As best I can tell these were made between about 1982 and 1987, so that makes it a whopping 34 years old at best, yet possibly as old as 39! There's nothing automatic about this thing. Lights up sort of. Lights up better if it's left on for a bit. Platter motor starts maybe, but stops almost immediately. I get a little more spin from the Turn button, but not enough to get excited about. The arms start to move, but then quickly quits and stays parked. Plinth is in good shape, but the dust cover has some scratches. Platter has some kinda goo on it that does dissolve with alcohol. Opened it up and the carriage servo motor belt is toast. It fits about as well as the elastic waist band on a pair of 40 year old chonies. The worm gear is coated in dried out hardened grease. Every piece of double back tape holding the garage door, the aluminum platter surround or anything else it was used to secure has failed. In other words... this thing is a mess!

Is there anything good? YES! There is one good thing. It sports an MMC1 cartridge, which from what I've read would have been the top of the line at the time. No idea if it works, or if it is damaged or not.

I found a place in Denmark that sells a capacitor kit. Apparently fried caps are a primary cause of a sick 8002. They also sell the belts and other stuff. It's not stupid expensive, so I think I'm gonna give it a go. I've been able to locate the user and the service manuals, so that's helpful. There are a few videos too. This thing is very 80's looking. Looks like an Atari game console. My wife hates it. I like it. Well see if I can get anywhere with it. If I can make it work I think I'll give it to my kid to go with his Jolida 202a and his Meadowlarks. Yes, I've created the next generation of Meadowlark fan boi. Quite happy about it too. :)
For the hardened worm gear grease, I've had great success with Phil Wood Waterproof Grease in Technics linear-tracking turntable rehabs. It smells a bit funky (sort of like an army-navy store) as it is designed for mountain bike bearings.
 
Completely agree. My favorite project threads always have pictures... 👍

This is it set up intact. You can see the scratches on the dust cover in the lower left corner area...
Angled Intact Picture 1 (Small).jpg

And directly from the top. It doesn't too bad in the picture, but in person...😱
PXL_20210916_175838229.jpg

Here you can see the failed adhesive on the Garage Door to the right...
No Garage Door(Small).jpg

More failed adhesive where the aluminum platter surround is supposed to be...
PXL_20210916_174047087.jpg

This is the hatch underneath the tone arm. When I removed it... More failed adhesive...
Failed Adheasive(Small).jpg

Platter and hatch and stylus removed...
Open Platter Area(Small).jpg

Mung on the platter...
Mung on Platter (Small).jpg

Opened into what B&O calls "The Service Position"
PXL_20210916_174334832.jpg

The belt that is slipping badly...
PXL_20210916_174433021.jpg

The worm gear. It doesn't look bad in the picture. In fact it looks wet to me. It's not. It's bone dry and crusty...
PXL_20210916_174348394.jpg

One of the capacitors that I'll be replacing...
Capacitor (Small).jpg

Most, but not all of the other capacitors that need to be replaced are on the other side of this circuit board...
Circuit Board (Small).jpg

And the working end of the tone arm. I'm crossing my fingers that this still works... PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE! 🙏
Tone Arm(Small).jpg
 
Most of the parts are coming from Denmark so it's gonna be a minute till I get 'em. So, I decided to attack the adhesive.

Turns out I was wrong about the alcohol and plastic. It worked great! I used some of my wife's makeup remover pads and alcohol. The original adhesive was a double sided tape with a foam core. It's the foam core that disintegrated. Kinda like how the foam surrounds on a Cerwin-Vega woofer fail. Anyway I soaked a makeup pad with alcohol. Didn't saturate it, but made it moist. Then I started testing it on the disintegrated foam and adhesive on the plinth side of the garage door. I discovered that if I simply moistened the foam/adhesive that it came off pretty easy one layer at a time if I scraped it with the edge of a credit card. I needed to keep the debris from getting into the guts and circuitry; so, I hooked up a small vacuum cleaner and it's attachment for cleaning keyboards, and used that to remove the debris as I scraped it off. Worked really well with absolutely no damage to the plastic whatsoever.

The technique didn't work so well removing the adhesive from metallic surfaces. It's really stuck on there and good too, so I'm thinkin' I'll use a Q-Tip and some acetone and see how well that does. I need to test it first to make sure that it's not too aggressive. I don't know if B&O used anything like a clear coat on their aluminum. It doesn't look like they did, but I want to be sure. If they did, I don't want to damage it. There's also a mat black finish on the Hatch that's under the tone arm. I don't want to damage that finish either. I'll let you know how that turns out.

Once done it'll be time to reattach everything with new tape. I looked around a bit and have decided to go with a 3M product. It's 3M 5925 Heavy Duty Foam Double Sided Mounting Tape. It's used for securing things like external automotive badging and stuff that needs to stand up to weather. I think the trick will be getting things lined up properly before I set them. I'm guessing it'll be a mess and a major cluster if I screw that part up. Not sure if I'll do it now or wait till I get the TT going again and then reattach everything. Why wait?

Some of the parts that can fail are getting hard to get from what I've read, for instance the processor chip. If mine's bad I may have a boat anchor in which case I might just be better off parting the whole thing out. It'll be easier to do that if it's in pieces. Or, I could just be the optimist that I normally am, charge ahead like I normally do, trusting that the universe with take care of it. Did I mention how much I'm REALLY hoping that MMC1 still works?
 
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