Affordable Roon Endpoint

So if I understand this thread, this basically functions like a Sonore microRendu for under $100?

I might need one of these for the garage system.
@Olson_jr Although not familiar with the Sonore microRendu I checked out the features and it appears that way. All the different Modes supported by the Sonore appear to be configurable from the RoPieee user interface

I just built 2 last evening and have them connected to my main system and one in my headphone system. Just under $90 bucks for each when purchasing the pieces needed from Amazon. Had both up and going in a little over an hour.

Screen Shot 2020-07-15 at 2.24.26 PM.png
 
Greetings,

Here are some examples from my personal experience using rpi's, Roon, and Ropieee. It echoes much of what Mike and others have said - I hope it helps.

Endpoints: I use the raspberry pi's for Roon endpoints (a RPI 3B+ and a 4B w/2GB mem). Right now a 3b+ feeds a Klipsch speaker in one room, another Klipsch is connected via USB in another room. The 4b is the endpoint for a remote listening area and has a Khadas Tone Board for the DAC and a JDS labs Atom for the amplifier (both well reviewed and cost $99 ea.).

Roon zones: The nice part is that I can tie all of them together in one "zone" then simultaneously play the same music to all of them, i.e., whole house sound. The limitations are Roon does not do DLNA and you cannot "mix" protocols, for example, you cannot put an airplay device in the same zone with Roon's distribution protocol, Roon Advanced Audio Transport (RAAT).

Ropieee: The 4b has Ropieee XL installed and receives over Airplay and DLNA in addition to Roon's RAAT, so I can send music to the Khadas/Atom, with a phone or tablet using e.g., Neutron and DLNA, Jriver using the remote app, or Roon's remote app. and of course Airplay. I've had Ropieee running for over a year now on the the 3b+ w/out any issues.

You might also consider pi-hat's - some can be had for $25-$50, e.g., hifiberry, allo.
 
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Great info in this thread. I just ordered a Pi 4 today with the 8gb RAM. I’ve been streaming music from my PC to my appleTV via Plex to my new Yggy DAC these last few weeks but it tops out at 16 bit and I want to get the full 24 bit from Tidal and the high Rez albums I have.

I Installed Roon this morning on my PC and it seems very user friendly (except the price tag). Although the sheer cheapness of the Pi sort of makes up for it. I was looking at putting together a new ITX system for music but these RaspberryPi’s seem great. So cheap and versatile. Must thank the people running these on this forum as I’d not heard of them before.
 
Although the sheer cheapness of the Pi sort of makes up for it. I was looking at putting together a new ITX system for music but these RaspberryPi’s seem great. So cheap and versatile. Must thank the people running these on this forum as I’d not heard of them before.

I have had an ITX system for about 3 years and it is the hub of everything, it runs Jriver and Roon and feeds several direct and wireless connected devices, some are described in my earlier post.

Its tiny, dead quiet, and fits anywhere. If you plan on growing, you might keep thinking about it:-)
 
I have had an ITX system for about 3 years and it is the hub of everything, it runs Jriver and Roon and feeds several direct and wireless connected devices, some are described in my earlier post.

Its tiny, dead quiet, and fits anywhere. If you plan on growing, you might keep thinking about it:-)
I have a spare PC collecting dust and enough in parts to build another. But these are ATX systems and they are big. My DAC - the Yggy is huge... It's the size of an HTPC and it makes dropping another big box next to it out (WAF). The Raspberry Pi is such a neat way around it. An ITX system would be nice if I could stick a 4k drive in it and use it for that too, but the cost starts to add up since I can't even re-use the PSU from my ATX builds in there without getting a bigger case.
 
Just put my Raspberry Pi4 together. I ended up getting the 4gb one as there was a delay on the 8gb so I cancelled. I got everything and a case for just under $100. This thing is great, tucked out of the way. Playing Neil Young at 24 Bit from Tidal sounds really good.

RasbPi4.jpgRasPi4.jpg
 

marantzfan

Administrator
Staff member
That’s a nice case. Wonder how well it does at keeping things cool compared to the “heat sink” case I chose.
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
The fan seems very weak, but it’s tiny. These are pretty safe to leave on all the time right?

I would disconnect the fan, it should not be at all necessary for a Renderer/endpoint.

That fan is probably both electrically and mechanically noisy as well. The stick-on heat sinks, and the physical connection of the case top to the Ethernet and USB controller chips should be sufficient, though if they did not include any heat transfer paste or 3M thermal transfer pads, then the case top may not actually be making physical contact with those 2 chips.
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
These are pretty safe to leave on all the time right?

Yes, mine are on 24/7 except for occasional power outages.

That said, this is also a question of the quality (or lack thereof) of the SMPS in use. I've always gravitated towards spending a bit more there for peace of mind.

For example, the PWR+ found on Amazon is only slightly more expensive than various other pieces of junk, but it would seem very worth it given it is UL rated, and it is made in Taiwan, not mainland China.

The same would be true of other known reliable SMPS units such as the laptop brick style 5 volt Mean Well, I would not worry about the RPi itself, nor any reputable power supplies, but other generic or rebranded generic SMPS units are likely best left unplugged when not in use.
 
You’ve been a great source of info in all of this Mikey! The heat sinks did come with a thermal pad. I think they should be ok. The power supply has a power on/off switch too which is quite handy. I bought the Vilros kit off of Amazon. Figured they would have matched a decent PSU.
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
You’ve been a great source of info in all of this Mikey! The heat sinks did come with a thermal pad. I think they should be ok. The power supply has a power on/off switch too which is quite handy.
Were there thermal pads for those two posts in the case top that are designed to make physical contact with the small Ethernet and USB controllers? If so the case should remain warm to the touch with no fan.

The biggest sources of heat are the CPU/SoC, and the overlooked switching regulator, very few of these cases address that part and it does heat up.

I have one heat sink case with the dumb name Geekworm that does physically contact that part (#1 below), but most others do not:

Geekworm (1).jpg
 
There are no thermal pads between the posts and the two other chips. I have some arctic silver kicking around somewhere though. I don’t know how well those posts make contact.
 
Whoops, looks like 'someone' did not actually check their Amazon Basket before hitting buy.

I got the package so I guess I will be joining this club.
I’ve done that before. Bought something I meant to save for later. On the plus side you’re going to love it. It’s just such a neat little thing. Already I’m thinking about other projects I could use one of these on.
 

Olson_jr

Active Member
So, I’m assuming the Ethernet cable is connected from a pc to the RPi? Does that mean that I access the RPi through a web browser on the connected PC?

Also, is that where I will be able to connect the RPi to my WiFi and enter the WiFi password? Maybe I missed it but I didn’t see this step in either your instructions or the RoPieee site.

I’m guessing a lot of this will be pretty straightforward but figured it doesn’t hurt to ask before proceeding. ;)

Anthony, did you have to do any config to get yours recognized by your WiFi? I copied your build, installed the XL version and it works via Ethernet but I am wondering what has/had to be done for WiFi?

Doing some reading after the fact I don't think I even needed the XL version.
 

marantzfan

Administrator
Staff member
Anthony, did you have to do any config to get yours recognized by your WiFi? I copied your build, installed the XL version and it works via Ethernet but I am wondering what has/had to be done for WiFi?

Doing some reading after the fact I don't think I even needed the XL version.

While it was still connected via Ethernet, I went into the menu by typing in the ip address of the RPi into a browser on my computer. In the setup menus there is a section where you can activate WiFi and select a network. It saw my network instantly and I just had to type in the password.

I then unplugged it and put it in my system and it worked and was recognized by my Roon core immediately. Very painless.

I think @MikeyFresh described the process above in one of his posts in more detail.
 
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