Anyone only streaming music now?

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Future Dog Names sounds like a good name for a band.
They sound like one of those bands that are made for streaming - one GREAT song, and a whole lot of forgettable fluff. But they make a career out of it and 30 years from now will be playing the Stark County Fair, where girls named Jennifer will happily dance and go "wooo!" to that one song, drunk on hard cider, despite being annoyed that they saved it for the last encore.
 
Jumping in twenty days later; Haven time has been pretty rare for me these days...

I've been streaming nearly exclusively for a number of years now. Really, since Mog hit the scene. After years of thrift shop / yard sale scrounging for physical media, I was completely burned out. My musical tastes are NOT reflected by 99.999999% of all second-hand physical media. So once I found Mog, I realized that there were nearly infinite rabbit holes I could chase! My tastes then were predominantly prog rock and classical jazz. Since then, they have shifted to post-rock and post-fusion jazz. I use Amazon HD as my streaming provider, despite the fact that I have nothing to do with Amazon if I can help it. Oh well, when it comes to something I truly care about, I guess I'm a sellout. :-)

What's interesting is that I actually just purchased my first record album in y e a r s. The group is "Old Solar", the album is See. There was this limited release yellow vinyl with blue splatter, and I just couldn't help myself. But I would have known nothing about them were it not for the incredible musical access that I have through streaming.

Side Note: If you are into post-rock, you owe it to yourself to check out the web page of A Thousand Arms. I have been turned on to some incredible music from listening to the artists that are represented by them, including Old Solar.
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Jumping in twenty days later; Haven time has been pretty rare for me these days...

I've been streaming nearly exclusively for a number of years now. Really, since Mog hit the scene. After years of thrift shop / yard sale scrounging for physical media, I was completely burned out. My musical tastes are NOT reflected by 99.999999% of all second-hand physical media. So once I found Mog, I realized that there were nearly infinite rabbit holes I could chase! My tastes then were predominantly prog rock and classical jazz. Since then, they have shifted to post-rock and post-fusion jazz. I use Amazon HD as my streaming provider, despite the fact that I have nothing to do with Amazon if I can help it. Oh well, when it comes to something I truly care about, I guess I'm a sellout. :-)

What's interesting is that I actually just purchased my first record album in y e a r s. The group is "Old Solar", the album is See. There was this limited release yellow vinyl with blue splatter, and I just couldn't help myself. But I would have known nothing about them were it not for the incredible musical access that I have through streaming.

Side Note: If you are into post-rock, you owe it to yourself to check out the web page of A Thousand Arms. I have been turned on to some incredible music from listening to the artists that are represented by them, including Old Solar.
When you refer to post rock, is it bands like Mono?

Mog got me into steaming as well.
 

JoeThePop

Known member
Jumping in twenty days later; Haven time has been pretty rare for me these days...

I've been streaming nearly exclusively for a number of years now. Really, since Mog hit the scene. After years of thrift shop / yard sale scrounging for physical media, I was completely burned out. My musical tastes are NOT reflected by 99.999999% of all second-hand physical media. So once I found Mog, I realized that there were nearly infinite rabbit holes I could chase! My tastes then were predominantly prog rock and classical jazz. Since then, they have shifted to post-rock and post-fusion jazz. I use Amazon HD as my streaming provider, despite the fact that I have nothing to do with Amazon if I can help it. Oh well, when it comes to something I truly care about, I guess I'm a sellout. :-)

What's interesting is that I actually just purchased my first record album in y e a r s. The group is "Old Solar", the album is See. There was this limited release yellow vinyl with blue splatter, and I just couldn't help myself. But I would have known nothing about them were it not for the incredible musical access that I have through streaming.

Side Note: If you are into post-rock, you owe it to yourself to check out the web page of A Thousand Arms. I have been turned on to some incredible music from listening to the artists that are represented by them, including Old Solar.
Interesting. I'm a bit embarrassed to say I have never heard of post-rock as a music genre before. I just listened to Old Solar's EP "Quiet Prayers". Very atmospheric and soothing. I liked it but am wondering why they are considered post-rock. What (other than what Wikipedia says) "makes" a band post-rock?

And where does one start to discover other groups in this genre?
 
Interesting. I'm a bit embarrassed to say I have never heard of post-rock as a music genre before. I just listened to Old Solar's EP "Quiet Prayers". Very atmospheric and soothing. I liked it but am wondering why they are considered post-rock. What (other than what Wikipedia says) "makes" a band post-rock?

And where does one start to discover other groups in this genre?
Hey, I'm glad you got to listen to "Quiet Prayers". That album is probably outside the realm of post-rock, as it was more of a side project of the band. The definition of post-rock is pretty nebulous. There are some "core" bands, such as Mogwai, This Will Destroy You, Explosions In The Sky, etc. But there's a fairly wide latitude, from post-metal, to ambient drone. Another band I really like is "Ranges", they are pretty similar to Old Solar.

A few places to look: acloserlisten.com - you can find releases and reviews of a pretty wide range of music, including post-rock. Bandcamp is where a lot of the smaller groups release their music. Also record distributors: A Thousand Arms and Pelagic Records.

My personal feeling about post-rock is that there is much more engagement with the music, as opposed to listening to "popular" rock. It demands an investment of your time and attention, but the payoff, for me at least, is massive. Popular rock music connects at a hormonal level, but post-rock connects at a much deeper, quasi-spiritual level. YMMV, of course. For the person who is used to two minutes and thirty seconds of frenetic guitars, vocals, and drums, post-rock doesn't stand a chance. But for the person willing to let themselves be drawn into the music and be swept through the ebbs and swells, it can be deeply exhilirating journey.
 
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JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Yes, MONO (of Japan) is one of the biggest post-rock bands, and I love their music. I think they are considered "crescendo-core", within the overall domain of post-rock.
I like them a lot. Saw them twice in concert. Crescendo core is an apt description. Beautiful show live.

The only other bands I’m familiar with like that are relatively mainstream. Mogwai. And they will know us by the trail of the dead. A silver mt Zion. Sigur Ros?
 
um, what's mog?
Mog was the first (?) of the "modern" music streaming services. Maybe Spotify was first, I don't remember. But it was a game changer in how people listened to music. Mog was cruelly morphed into Beats Music, which was assimilated into the Apple hive mind, and became Apple Music. No, I'm not still bitter...
 

adaug

Awaiting Updated Member Status.
mog sounds like a perfect name for a service on which to stream post-rock.

when i think of post-rock the band that springs to mind first is tortoise.

had not heard the term crescendo core before but it clicks. a band like that which i dig is godspeed you black emperor.
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
Mog was the first (?) of the "modern" music streaming services. Maybe Spotify was first, I don't remember. But it was a game changer in how people listened to music. Mog was cruelly morphed into Beats Music, which was assimilated into the Apple hive mind, and became Apple Music. No, I'm not still bitter...
MOG was first, they started in June 2005, Spotify came almost a year later in April 2006.

In the beginning MOG was very MySpace-like, more a social media and blog type of thing than what it eventually became. The actual subscription music streaming service didn't happen until late 2009, so in that sense Spotify was actually first.
 
I think I peaked when I was smoking some... stuff with some This Will Destroy You folks at a house party. I'd highly recommend some of the post-post-rock work their bassist is doing under the moniker Black Taffy.

Definitely have challenged my already limited hearing at Mono, Explosions in the Sky, TWDY and the like.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
I've somehow missed the term "post-rock", but I've been listening to the music since sometime the 80s, starting with Sigur Rós. I've just always thought of it as a pulling-together of a few earlier streams in both the classical and rock-ish veins.
 
Me my Maxell chair Amazon hd music and some great active speakers. Tons of discovery at every session. It's a different sport than the collectors way. It is what I'm about now and has brought me great joy.
 
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adaug

Awaiting Updated Member Status.
Tons of discovery at every session. It's a different sport than the collectors way.
well put. for me, the "unlimited collection" aspect of streaming often leads to sampling bits of songs and moving on - even if i like them. streaming promotes ADD?
 
well put. for me, the "unlimited collection" aspect of streaming often leads to sampling bits of songs and moving on - even if i like them. streaming promotes ADD?
I have done that. Then i started marking things for compiling playlist. For me the ADD mood inevitably leads me to something that speaks to me and i will listen to the whole piece . Yesterday this happened. 15 minutes of sifting through the "people also listened to" tab and then i discovered this great album by Eric Johnson and Mike stem. Had incredible sonic range with interesting world cultural elements and it immediately grabbed me. Listened to it all the way through and was transported. I will say, that with the hd speakers i have an affinity for some modern full range recordings because for the first time i can hear them! I still listen to old classics too. I recently discovered a funky live album from dr Lonnie Smith at club Mozambique in Detroit in 1970. It has congas sax guitar and organ. It's inspired and had nice push. The performance is there and pulled me in despite it not being hd modern recording. There's a lot of classics I've yet to discover.
 
Me my Maxell chair Amazon hd music and some great active speakers. Tons of discovery at every session. It's a different sport than the collectors way. It is what I'm about now and had brought me great joy.
I'm at the same place and am not looking back. I gave my LP's to a friend and most of my CD's went to a church thrift store. I kept the Mo-Fi's etc. I'm no longer interested in collecting more physical media or purchasing hi-rez downloads.
 
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