Anyone Run Dirac?

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
While I love my floor to ceiling glass living room wall, I don’t love what it does for the sound of my system. Some furniture and a rug has helped, but once the volume starts going up, I can hear the weird reflections taking over. And I really don’t want to make my room look like a recording studio.

To that end, I’ve been thinking about trying Dirac to fix my room. The room tuning I did with my quite antiquated HK amp was impressive enough, so I’d love to hear what the modern stuff does.

Anyone messing with any Dirac gear? Any recommendations on what to use? I will definitely need something that will handle analog inputs.

Thanks!
 

rogerfederer

Junior Member
i have a miniDSP with DIRAC. did great job of cleaning up a non-uniform room. wasn't too hard to figure out (big manual on the miniDSP site).
 

Pat McGinty

Senior Member
There's nothing bad about serial processing, go right ahead and jiggle the bits as much as you like. The speakers accept either SPDIF or AES, and they have no idea what you've done to the data beforehand.

Dirac, sure. The thing you want to keep in mind is that the problem is that the reflections and ringing will still be there. Knocking down a peak does sound better, but not as good as dealing with the peak. A reflection can be mirrored out, but the "anti-signal" that kills it at the listening position can sound funny in other locations.

In many rooms, merely knocking down the handful of peaks makes quite an improvement. The PEQ works in real time, so play your most offensive track, pop in a wide and deep notch then jiggle the freq until you hear it kill one of the nasties, then shrink the notch (while still jiggling a bit) to get closer to pinpointing the problem. You may have numerous peaks including the dreaded 8' ceiling bump.

The quick and easy way is using an analyzer.

But you can get a crude glimpse of your troubles with these and a noise track.

Or, yeah, Dirac.
 

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
There's nothing bad about serial processing, go right ahead and jiggle the bits as much as you like. The speakers accept either SPDIF or AES, and they have no idea what you've done to the data beforehand.

Dirac, sure. The thing you want to keep in mind is that the problem is that the reflections and ringing will still be there. Knocking down a peak does sound better, but not as good as dealing with the peak. A reflection can be mirrored out, but the "anti-signal" that kills it at the listening position can sound funny in other locations.

In many rooms, merely knocking down the handful of peaks makes quite an improvement. The PEQ works in real time, so play your most offensive track, pop in a wide and deep notch then jiggle the freq until you hear it kill one of the nasties, then shrink the notch (while still jiggling a bit) to get closer to pinpointing the problem. You may have numerous peaks including the dreaded 8' ceiling bump.

The quick and easy way is using an analyzer.

But you can get a crude glimpse of your troubles with these and a noise track.

Or, yeah, Dirac.
So, what quick and easy analyzer do you recommend?

Or Dirac?
 

RichPA

Junior Member
I have a miniDSP running Dirac Live, too (DDRC-22D), and I love what it does for the sound. I've been using room correction for years, most recently the DSpeaker Antimode 2.0, but Dirac Live is by far the best of them in my experience. The setup is a little tedious, moving the microphone around for multiple measurements, but it's not hard. You don't need another analyzer if you're using the miniDSP.
 

Pat McGinty

Senior Member
RichPA is correct.

If you do care to own an analyzer, the Dayton Omnimic is great. PC based and inexpensive.

Just me, there's no substitute for being able too see what's happening.
 

Pat McGinty

Senior Member
This week I attended a Trinnov webinar regarding the use of their ultra deluxe room and speaker correction system, The Optimizer. Dirac shares many of the concepts.

Anyway, their head guy, Mr Jon Herron, had an elegant way of explaining the relationship between DSP and image focus. I wish I'd'a thunk of it, but thought I'd pass it along. If you click on The Optimizer tab and look at the graphs for uncorrected and corrected amplitude responses you'll see how things work out:


Jon illustrated the problem by saying (paraphrasing) "When you pluck the A string on a guitar you hear the fundamental at 110Hz, then 220, 440, 880 and so on. So if they are not all appearing to come from the same locus you'll have a loss of focus and a spooky one, too boot. Some of your trouble comes from the speakers not quite matching, but most of it comes from the room"

Of course this is true. One can dial in closely coincident arrivals manually with an analyzer. But why not let Dirac do the work? Once you get accustomed to things lining up so tightly, you'll be spoiled.

Ummm.....I'm saving my pennies up for a Trinnov. Ouch. Had one here on loan and now I'm totally ruined for it. :(
 
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