Cassette Tape Sunday

Catcher10

Senior Member
Very nice deck! I bet it sounded great. Akai made some nice tape gear.
It was the best one I ever owned and yea made amazing tapes. It had the traditional issues these decks had, the FFW/REV function would quit or very slow on both. The door was motorized so it would not close fully and you had to nudge it closed which made the tape and heads not align well usually.
I bought it new in like '83-84, finally put it in the dumpster around 2002, I should have kept it and tried to fix but I was not thinking.
I'm sure I could find another....
 

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
It was the best one I ever owned and yea made amazing tapes. It had the traditional issues these decks had, the FFW/REV function would quit or very slow on both. The door was motorized so it would not close fully and you had to nudge it closed which made the tape and heads not align well usually.
I bought it new in like '83-84, finally put it in the dumpster around 2002, I should have kept it and tried to fix but I was not thinking.
I'm sure I could find another....
Here ya go! Just needs belts.

https://m.ebay.ca/itm/Akai-GX-F31-Cassette-Deck-Please-Read/323023359888?hash=item4b35b14f90:g:Z4IAAOSwrlRZ0J63
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
Then there was something off with your deck. On any properly set up and aligned deck, with the right tape, and the bias set properly, Dolby C should sound pretty well invisible (yes, I get what I did there). Sadly, most decks especially running today, are not aligned properly, nor are they biased properly for the tape being used. Get that stuff wrong, and Dolby C can sound dreadful.
I'm talking about new decks (plural) when Dolby C was a thing. We had a couple (not high end, by any means); they didn't do it for me. "B" was OK on them. One was a Sony (EDIT: TC-FX30) that we had and used for many years.


(borrowed photo)
One thing I (really) liked about that deck, FWIW, was the dynamic range of the meters (-40 to +8 dB).
 
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mhardy6647

Señor Member
FWIW - I hate working on cassette decks' mechanical innards. Maybe it's just me. One of three things always happens to me when I do.

1) I cannot figure out how to get to the stuff that needs to be changed. I take off layer after layer of things but actually gaining access to all of the things around which the belt(s) has/have to loop around eludes me.
2) Some tiny and mission critical part goes flying off into the aether with enough kinetic energy to disappear from this instance of the Multiverse in which we mortals dwell.
3) I break something else.

I believe my success rate in mechanical repair of cassette decks is identically zero percent. YMMV, of course.
 

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
I'm talking about new decks (plural) when Dolby C was a thing. We had a couple (not high end, by any means); they didn't do it for me. "B" was OK on them. One was a Sony (EDIT: TC-FX30) that we had and used for many years.


(borrowed photo)
One thing I (really) liked about that deck, FWIW, was the dynamic range of the meters (-40 to +8 dB).
Having talked to a number of tape techs over the years, it was not unusual for a new deck back then to end up in the owners hands and not be aligned properly. Just as I'm willing to bet 99% of turntables in the "golden age" were not set up right either.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
That's heartbreaking. Especially the loss of your own performances. But a small price to pay, I suppose, to get out of that horrible situation.
Yes indeed. If I really desperately wanted copies of the performances I probably could track down people who have copies. Only the completely solo stuff doesn't exist elsewhere and is gone to glory. I can still hear them by playing though.... hah.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Having talked to a number of tape techs over the years, it was not unusual for a new deck back then to end up in the owners hands and not be aligned properly. Just as I'm willing to bet 99% of turntables in the "golden age" were not set up right either.
I'm sure that precious few of anything was working at its best. The owners didn't have nearly so much knowledge as we have now, nor was it easy to come by.
 
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