Digitizing LPs with a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 and Pro-Ject 1-Xpression Carbon Turntable

Hello,
I'm interested in digitizing my record collection.
To that end I ordered the Focusrite Scarlet 2i2 Audio interface.
As the title says I'm using a Pro-Ject 1-Expression turn table.
The turn table does not have a built in amplifier.
Will plugging the turn table directly into the focusrite work, or do I need a pre-amp between the two?

Also, is there a good walk through for setting up and digitizing with the Focusrite?
The videos I'm finding seem to deal with digitizing music from microphones and musical instruments.

Any help appreciated.
Thanks,
Mike
 
Hi @shaharidan
I'm not familiar with the Focusrite Scarlet 2i2 Audio Interface personally. After looking at the specifications on the Scarlet 2i2, the 2 analog inputs will accept analog line level. This means you will require a phono preamplifier between the Pro-Ject 1 expression turntable and the Scarlet 2i2. The output of the phono preamplifier will provide line level out to the Scarlet 2i2.

What software are you using to record digitally?
 
Thanks guys.
As far as software goes, I guess I don't know yet.
Audacity seems to be the popular choice, so I was planning to try that.
The Focusrite comes with pro-tools, so that's a possibility as well.
I've never done it before, so I'll need to figure out what works for me.

I'm also wondering about how to add meta-data, but one thing at a time :).
 
The Focusrite comes with pro-tools, so that's a possibility as well.
Not familiar with Pro-Tools but if that comes free, starting there makes sense. Besides metadata, you will want the ability to record the entire side of the LP and then post-recording break the individual tracks out. I'd be surprised if Pro-Tools doesn't offer that capability.
 
I started down the path you are pursuing. After 30 albums and 60 hours I'd had enough. Went to Discogs, Amazon and other sources and bought the cd's for 2.99 to 8.99 and just rip'd from there. I know there are alot you can't get on cd or cd for cheap but got the ones I would like to listen to the most. That has been so long ago I don't even remember the software I used. However, if I remember correctly, ran the TT to the HT receiver then tape out to my desktop computer's sound card and recorded to the hard drive. The pain in the ass was the separating the tracks and naming each one. With all the wiz bang software and apps we have now I can't believe there isn't something that can't automatically do those steps.
 

Andyman

Junior Member
I did only 3 rips of Moby Grapes "Grape Jam" a few months back, but have been busier outside now that the weather broke. I also returned to work last week and that thoroughly disrupted my schedule and erased 10 hours/day from my leisurely schedule, perhaps even 13-14 as I've decided not to live on 4-5 hours of sleep weekdays.

That being said, my 24/192 rips really did sound sweet in Audacity. I'm looking forward to doing more once I get reacclimated to the working world, and post my results/impressions here.

FWIW, I just made simple rips; one solid side non-stop, w/o any metadata, track cutting, or noise processing
Basically, it was pretty much like making a digital cassette tape...
 
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If the Focusrite has two mic preamps you should be able to use those for amplifying the cartridge output and apply the RIAA curves in software. I have never done this but there are people who advocate it strongly.

Because I have never embraced Mac computers I have been interested in Vinyl Studio but there is a really good looking Mac software that I almost would build a Mac music server for.


To me this looks like the best LP digitizing solution. It might be worth setting up a dedicated Mac to use it. Note that it does not seem to work with the latest versions. You need to make certain your Mac can run it.

The guy that wrote purevinyl has some you tube vids from RMAF that show it in operation.
The software is $379 which is a lot but it looks like it is worth it. A robot that does all kinds of work for you. If you have a lot of records to digitize it could save a lot of time.
 
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JP

Junior Member
If the Focusrite has two mic preamps you should be able to use those for amplifying the cartridge output and apply the RIAA curves in software. I have never done this but there are people who advocate it strongly.
For an MC cart probably ok. Likely won’t work well with an MM out of the box due to loading requirements.

RIAA in Audacity is easy. I’d use biquads in the nyquist prompt rather than the built-in EQ but both will get you there.
 
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