DIY Cabinets and Corning 703

Looking for advice from those who have been down this road before with fiberglass bat--what is your preferred way of attaching Corning 703, or similar products, to the internal walls of speaker cabinets? Spray-on adhesive? Screws with washers? Staples? Something else entirely?
 
Thanks, both. I have a bunch of gorilla glue here already, so I'll give that a shot. Working on an Altec 9849-ish project. Will post some pics once I'm further along.
 
Does anyone else out there own a pair of 9849s or have good familiarity with them? I'm wondering how much fiberglass (or similar material) was used in the original design. I was originally thinking of trying the live end dead end approach found in earlier Altec cabs, but would love to know what Altec actually did in the 9849. Been scouring photos online but have yet to come across one that provides a good enough view of what's going on inside.
 
Thanks for the info, skynet. Is the inside of the front baffle covered in fiberglass too? Would love to see a pic or two if you have them opened up already.

I'd be interested in learning more about the reasons for Altec's use of LE/DE vs. 4 walls and back damping techniques in their various cabinets. Was it application-specific (theatre vs. studio vs. home) or more of a reaction to changes in popular music, amplifier power, tastes in sound, etc.? Or, am I just completely off base? Subjectively speaking, it feels to me like the LE/DE approach creates a lively box with excellent sensitivity, great dynamics, spaciousness...almost like a live concert experience. Highly damped box feels less sensitive (not so great with SE 45, for example), but improves focus and certain details...creates a punchier, more "hi-fi" experience. I know I'm generalizing, but that's been my brief experience experimenting with the 9849s. Same for the crossover--simple first order, single cap to tweeter and it's all about that improved sensitivity, super dynamics...just effortless sound. Throw on a 32343-ish crossover and I get back to that more "hi-fi" sound that works better for more modern types of music. All of these approaches have their pluses and minuses depending on the type of music I want to listen to. If someone could only design a way to switch between these approaches with the switch of a button...

Last thing--The WE753, which the Altec 9849 appears to be a less handsome, distant cousin of. Looking at pictures online, of what appear to be completely original specimens, I'm seeing examples of LE/DE damping and 4 wall/and back damping. Wonder what that was all about...
 
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Thanks for the info, skynet. Is the inside of the front baffle covered in fiberglass too? Would love to see a pic or two if you have them opened up already.

I'd be interested in learning more about the reasons for Altec's use of LE/DE vs. 4 walls and back damping techniques in their various cabinets. Was it application-specific (theatre vs. studio vs. home) or more of a reaction to changes in popular music, amplifier power, tastes in sound, etc.? Or, am I just completely off base? Subjectively speaking, it feels to me like the LE/DE approach creates a lively box with excellent sensitivity, great dynamics, spaciousness...almost like a live concert experience. Highly damped box feels less sensitive (not so great with SE 45, for example), but improves focus and certain details...creates a punchier, more "hi-fi" experience. I know I'm generalizing, but that's been my brief experience experimenting with the 9849s. Same for the crossover--simple first order, single cap to tweeter and it's all about that improved sensitivity, super dynamics...just effortless sound. Throw on a 32343-ish crossover and I get back to that more "hi-fi" sound that works better for more modern types of music. All of these approaches have their pluses and minuses depending on the type of music I want to listen to. If someone could only design a way to switch between these approaches with the switch of a button...

Last thing--The WE753, which the Altec 9849 appears to be a less handsome, distant cousin of. Looking at pictures online, of what appear to be completely original specimens, I'm seeing examples of LE/DE damping and 4 wall/and back damping. Wonder what that was all about...
Hi Mdye
front baffle no fiberglass. I got my speaker from some local garage band.
I remove all the fiberglass try to patch up some holes and properly not going to put the fiberglass back in. For damping material I’ll probably use Cellulose Wadding.
CC46AEA0-274F-47C8-9069-9EDBA7970320.jpeg
6AFF5C86-BDA6-4434-8645-37804C7BA653.jpeg
 
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