Edited: Now potentially looking for new preamplifier 11.23.2021

@MikeyFresh I already use a Lenovo i7 Tiny PC to take care of those 3 for streaming files. I have no interest in dropping Amazon Music HD for either Qobuz or Tidal even if the price wasn't higher; been there, tried them. I'm good where I'm at for that part and the Lenovo's USB is already feeding an old temporary Muse USB DAC I've had for some time now. I don't really care to have to deal with Linux stuff and, thankfully, don't have to deal with them or Apple with the city things I work with every day (network administrator). ;)

I can also buy a Node at rep sample cost through some past work channel connections I have so its price isn't too bad. But it was mainly just an idea, kind of like potentially using an NAD C658 with it built in; the price is reasonable for either. It would be nice to be able to use a phone or tablet for AMHD similar to how Spotify Connect works, which is handy, but as you mentioned, that may not ever happen.

It's not the worst thing ever using a keyboard with AMHD and Spotify showing on the TV, I guess. I do like convenience and electronic toys. I guess that's why I spent 25+ years in the industry till the market went south in 2008 and I got out of it. lol AMHD is definitely not the easiest thing to navigate but it does sound decent for what it is and the price is right.

I appreciate the input!
 
@MikeyFresh But for the sake of knowing, lets say I did cancel AMHD and switch to Tidal and do something with a Pi. Of course, I admit AMHD access via desktop sucks bad. My ultimate "goal", if possible, would be to have a streaming service where I can control it from either my Android phone, or a tablet, and maybe desktop (potentially). My main positives for AMHD and Spotify being on the desktop and video output to a 55" TV is that it's nice to see everything plus I do browse the internet while listening to music. Maybe that's where the desktop has an advantage....but only IF it's allowing for 192kHz output to the DAC.

But I would be game for a Pi if I could have some control through a phone, etc. I'll always have a Spotify account because I can play music throughout my house using various Google devices. My wife likes playing music through the rest of the house in a basic manner as I don't have audio gear in the living room or anywhere else; it's just upstairs. So, the Google Nest Mini's and Hubs are scattered about along with other Smart Home devices.

I currently can't get a new Node from the rep firm as they are hardly available anyway due to all the supply/shipping BS.
 

MikeyFresh

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But for the sake of knowing, lets say I did cancel AMHD and switch to Tidal and do something with a Pi. Of course, I admit AMHD access via desktop sucks bad. My ultimate "goal", if possible, would be to have a streaming service where I can control it from either my Android phone, or a tablet, and maybe desktop (potentially).
I'd skip TIDAL and their MQA bullshit at $20/mo. and go with Qobuz and real hi-res at $13/mo. instead, but thats just my opinion.

You can control either Qobuz or TIDAL from an Android app, and direct the stream to a Raspberry Pi distro such as Moode or Volumio.

Either BubbleUPnP, or mconnect HD allow for that, both work quite well with Qobuz but I can't comment directly on TIDAL because I'm not and have never been a subscriber.

For Spotify, you need a Spotify Premium account, and then yes you can stream Spotify directly to a Raspberry Pi running Moode or Volumio via Spotify Connect, but only with a Premium account.
 
I'd skip TIDAL and their MQA bullshit at $20/mo. and go with Qobuz and real hi-res at $13/mo. instead, but thats just my opinion.

You can control either Qobuz or TIDAL from an Android app, and direct the stream to a Raspberry Pi distro such as Moode or Volumio.

Either BubbleUPnP, or mconnect HD allow for that, both work quite well with Qobuz but I can't comment directly on TIDAL because I'm not and have never been a subscriber.

For Spotify, you need a Spotify Premium account, and then yes you can stream Spotify directly to a Raspberry Pi running Moode or Volumio via Spotify Connect, but only with a Premium account.


I do agree with you on the MQA part. I really don't care to pay for that so Qobuz would be fine with me. I do have a Spotify Premium account, too.

I think mainly it's going to be a matter of what it takes for it to work with the Raspberry Pi stuff; that's where I'll be a little out in left field but definitely don't mind going at it. For instance, if a person, like you per chance, could say, "ok, here are the things you need to buy to make this work", then I could be on it. lol
 

MikeyFresh

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I think mainly it's going to be a matter of what it takes for it to work with the Raspberry Pi stuff; that's where I'll be a little out in left field but definitely don't mind going at it. For instance, if a person, like you per chance, could say, "ok, here are the things you need to buy to make this work", then I could be on it. lol
Thats no problem at all, and I'm not the only one here who uses Raspberry Pi in this way.

One other question though regards whether or not you have any local storage library or not. So far you've only mentioned using the streaming services, but some people also have a hard drive full off local storage library tracks they wish to access.

The difference is while these Raspberry Pi units make great little endpoint/streamers, they don't do as well as a local storage server, specifically not with a zillion tracks to index and catalog, along with thumb nailing the album cover art.

You can still use a Raspberry Pi as a local server, but it is highly recommended to split that job out and use a 2nd RPi for that specific job, it is merely a library/repository that indexes your hard drive, and then serves those tracks to other endpoints on the network, but it doesn't actually physically connect to any stereo itself, only the endpoints do.

To put that in Bluesound-speak, the local server would be a Vault, while the endpoints would be Nodes.

But before we get into all of that description, a simple question is do you have a local storage library of tracks you've ripped from CD for example, and if so, how many tracks?

If you don't have any local storage library to be concerned with and only really use the subscription streaming services, that very much simplifies things.
 
One other question though regards whether or not you have any local storage library or not. So far you've only mentioned using the streaming services, but some people also have a hard drive full off local storage library tracks they wish to access.

I guess I did fail to mention that. I do have a Synology NAS that stores about 1100 CD's (360gb or so) that I access using JRiver, which has become more rare, but don't want to give that up just yet. :) All of those CD's are still packed in 2 boxes since we moved into the house we finished building 5/19. I just sold a 25 pound Onkyo Reference CD play that I thought I might use...but never did.
 
A bit off topic, but I'm. Curious about your Carver gear. What was done to it? Did it improve the sound? How do you enjoy it?

Well, I've had the M-1.0t amp and C-1 preamp for maybe 14 years now. Picked them up at yard sale in Denton, TX that apparently a woman who had recently divorced was having. I gave a paltry $20 for the pair along with an EQ of some kind that I sold off. Also picked up a pair of Polk Audio Monitor 10b's at same sale for $3 for the pair. Gave them to my beat friend summer of 2009 when I moved back to AR and went back to college at 43. But that's another story.

On The Carver Site forum, there are some smart techie people who love Bob's gear who basically re-engineered and updated things exponentially. Like my C-1 preamp, I did quite a bit of work myself including changing out close to 200 caps, resistors, etc., along with all new RCA connections on the back. A friend from the website, who lives in Maine, added remote volume and muting, which I enjoy a lot!

The amp was updated to what's called an MkII Opt 002 which takes it from the original 200wpc rating up to 460wpc. It's a beast and it sounds wonderful. I sometimes think of buying a new amp but then decide not to. I've attached a link to a site for the guy that does them a lot. A great tech.

 

MikeyFresh

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I guess I did fail to mention that. I do have a Synology NAS that stores about 1100 CD's (360gb or so) that I access using JRiver, which has become more rare, but don't want to give that up just yet. :) All of those CD's are still packed in 2 boxes since we moved into the house we finished building 5/19. I just sold a 25 pound Onkyo Reference CD play that I thought I might use...but never did.
OK that can stay a JRiver instance, you'd simply enable JRiver's Media Server setting and those local tracks could also then be served to the Raspberry Pi endpoint/player/streamer via the same DLNA/UPnP network protocol used for the cloud streaming.

The last question is do you have hard wired Ethernet connection available near the stereo, or must this be a WiFi connection?
 
OK that can stay a JRiver instance, you'd simply enable JRiver's Media Server setting and those local tracks could also then be served to the Raspberry Pi endpoint/player/streamer via the same DLNA/UPnP network protocol used for the cloud streaming.

The last question is do you have hard wired Ethernet connection available near the stereo, or must this be a WiFi connection?

I use hard wired connection whenever I can and we wired whole house for those devices that could. Wifi wise, I have Ubiquiti AP's.
 
@mikey FYI... Last night, I was having issues with the new Topping D10S and it showing the right "stuff" Amazon Music HD was playing. So, I decided to just sign up for Qobuz and give it a whirl. Wow is all I can say. It worked right, sounded SO much better, and the DAC would show when songs changed their sampling rate.

Amazon Music dropped and signed up with Qubuz. Problem solved.
 

MikeyFresh

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I use hard wired connection whenever I can and we wired whole house for those devices that could. Wifi wise, I have Ubiquiti AP's.
OK Ethernet is preferred when using a metal enclosure on the RPi, however the onboard WiFi often still works in that scenario, depending on signal strength and distance to the router.
@mikey FYI... Last night, I was having issues with the new Topping D10S and it showing the right "stuff" Amazon Music HD was playing. So, I decided to just sign up for Qobuz and give it a whirl. Wow is all I can say. It worked right, sounded SO much better, and the DAC would show when songs changed their sampling rate.

Amazon Music dropped and signed up with Qubuz. Problem solved.

Sounds good, if you want to lose the connection of the main computer to the stereo, you can substitute a tiny Raspberry Pi as the actual "endpoint/streamer" or player that connects to the DAC, and stream to it using your Android phone or tablet as the Control Point.

Qobuz, Spotify, and your local JRiver server are all viable sources for the above, using either Moode or Volumio as the endpoint player's software.
 
OK Ethernet is preferred when using a metal enclosure on the RPi, however the onboard WiFi often still works in that scenario, depending on signal strength and distance to the router.


Sounds good, if you want to lose the connection of the main computer to the stereo, you can substitute a tiny Raspberry Pi as the actual "endpoint/streamer" or player that connects to the DAC, and stream to it using your Android phone or tablet as the Control Point.

Qobuz, Spotify, and your local JRiver server are all viable sources for the above, using either Moode or Volumio as the endpoint player's software.

Ok, so what do I need to order? :)
 

MikeyFresh

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Ok, so what do I need to order? :)
You need a Raspberry Pi 4B, however with the chip shortages they are in extremely short supply and it will probably stay that way until late January or early February.

For streamer duty the $35 1GB, or $45 2GB of RAM models are both completely sufficient, however the only in stock version I've seen in quite a while is the $55 4GB board, and those are vanishing fast.

I typically get those from PiShop.us, Chicago Electronic Distributors, CanaKit, or Vilros.

The enclosure is up to you, but various nice metal heat sink cases are available on Amazon. I'd get something like this:



For the microSD card I've had great results with name brand in retail packaging cards like SanDisk, Transcend, and Kingston, and recommend you get one of those. If your computer doesn't have an SD card slot, then you will also need a USB SD reader/writer in order to flash the RPi software to the card.

For a starter power supply, a decent U.L. listed SMPS unit like the CanaKit , or PWR+ will get the job done nicely, and you may not ever feel the need to explore upgrade options.

Use wired Ethernet as your network connection if you can, and order an appropriate length cable for that if you don't already have one. If your existing Ethernet cables are ancient/banged up/seen their better day, get a good quality Cat.6 cable such as this Belden.
 
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