Havenite Food Creations

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Japanese Fusion

I went out on a limb, and tried two things I had never made before. Preparing this dinner took significantly longer than I anticipated, but it tasted just fine.

First, a nice bowl of Japanese rice.

Next, a few segments of minneola, some new citrus hybrid. It is sweet, juicy and seedless.

Next, sections of locally grown purple asparagus, with a special drizzle sauce (olive oil, sushi vinegar, and mayonnaise).

Shiitake and Naganegi Stir-Fry: shiitake mushrooms, naganegi (scallions), sauteed in oilive oil and glazed with soy sauce and sake.

Simmered Spicy Konnyaku and Lotus Root: konnyaku (kojac root gel), lotus root, dashi (broth from kombu, katsuobushi, and dried shiitake mushrooms), sake, mirin, sugar, soy sauce, sesame oil, and gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes).

Chicken Miso Gratin: cubed chicken thigh meat, bechamel (white sauce), shiro miso (Japanese paste), dashi (broth from kombu, katsuobushi, and dried shiitake mushrooms), cubed Russet potato, slivered yellow onion, soy sauce, sea salt, fresh-ground black pepper, butter, panko (Japanese bread crumbs), chopped scallion greens,

This was all washed down with an ice cold bottle of sake (Hakutsuru Superior Junmai Ginjo).

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Tonight, I tried something a bit different....I followed these instructions and it came out crispy and tasty!
Be sure to NOT cut the potato all the way through! You want to be able to spread it as shown.
You are on. I shall be making some of these in the very near future...

Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Pot Roast

My beloved bride overruled my dinner plans, so she could try out her new Insta-Pot. That is just fine, since it turned out just as she hoped it would. It was very good, once we figured out how the Insta-Pot worked.

First, roasted corn-on-cob, with butter and sea salt.

Next, mashed potatoes, with gravy made from the pot liquor.

Finally, the pot roast, made with onion, garlic, sea salt & fresh-ground black pepper.

This was all washed down with an ice-cold Full Sail Amber.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Korean Seolleongtang, Etc.

An AK member, trhee, who serves as head chef at the US Embassy in Seol, Korea, has been an inspiration to me many times. When he posted that he had prepared and enjoyed this dish, quite some time back, I was intrigued, inspired and, admittedly, intimidated. I just did not think I could pull it off. I have prepared many, many Asian soups involving the simmering of bones and meat, but never has such preparation resulted in a broth that was white, as this dish requires. I figured there was just some sort of magic. Finally, my intrigue over-powered me, and I had no choice but to try, after quite a long period of research.

What is required is a long period of cold water soaking, followed by 10 minutes or so of what is called pre-boiling (dropping into a rolling boil of water for a brief period). The liquid products of both steps are discarded, and the bones and meat are massaged, and thoroughly cleaned after each step. Then, the bones are boiled, not simmered, for 12+ hours, adding water as it boils off, and skimming off whatever comes to the surface (fat, etc.). After around 6 hours, the broth begins to miraculously turn a milky white, which gets more and more that way as time progresses. The resulting broth is passed through a fine strainer at the end.

I found that my electric cooktop stove used quite a bit of energy, keeping this stuff boiling nicely. I used a seriously large stock pot. So, I moved over to my induction unit, and that reduced the energy used quite a bit, and added a bit of predictable control over the boil.

There are no spices in the broth, not even salt. This is because the tradition requires each individual to dress his/her soup at the table, just before, or as it is eaten. As it comes from the pot, the broth is quite bland tasting, but as soon as salt is added the intense beef flavor begins to pop. One must be very careful to add the salt slowly, tasting as you go, since it is very easy to go from not enough to too much. I also added several Korean banchan (side dishes) to enjoy with this soup, but the soup was so enjoyable, the banchan were not required at all, but did add to the festival feel of this meal.

First, a purchased banchan, Seasoned Radish (Surasang brand), which is made of dried radish, red pepper powder, corn syrup, soy sauce, green onion, garlic, sesame seed and sesame oil. The effect of making it with dried radish was to increase the crunchiness significantly.

Next, a purchased Kimchi (Cosmos brand), which is probiotic and alive in the jar, and is made of Napa cabbage, radish, red pepper, garlic, ginger, sea salt, onion, sugar, fish sauce, and water.

Next, kkakdugi (cubed diakon kimchi, most traditional for service with seolleongtang)): Korean radish (peeled and cubed), chopped scallion, gochugaru (Korean chili flakes), Vietnamese fish sauce (Red Boat brand), sugar, minced garlic, and sea salt.

Next, Fish Cake Banchan: thinly sliced and par boiled Korean fishcake, slivered yellow onion, slivered jalapeno pepper, slivered red and orange mini-sweet peppers, gochujang (Korean hot chili paste), soy sauce, honey, rice wine, minced garlic and toasted sesame oil.

Next, Kongnamul (Korean beansprout banchan): mung bean sprouts, chopped scallions, gochugaru (Korean chili flakes), soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, toasted and crushed sesame seeds, sea salt, minced garlic, and Vietnamese fish sauce (Red Boat brand).

Next, a small bowl of medium grain rice.

Finally, the Seolleongtang (Korean Ox Bone Soup): the broth (boiled beef bones), cross-cut, bone-in beef shank (boiled in the broth for several hours, then cooled and thin-sliced), served over a bed of Thai rice noodles, and dressed with the sliced beef shank. This was served with various elements to dress up your own bowl as desired: minced garlic, chopped scallions, coarse sea salt, fresh ground black pepper, sliced jalapeno peppers, dried Thai dragon chilis (crushed), and Vietnamese fish sauce.

This was all washed down with ice cold, Hite lager (from Seol, Korea).

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Korean Bibimbap

This is a most excellent way of using certain leftovers, and for breakfast at that. This is traditionally cooked in Korean stone bowls, which are expensive and too specific for my use (limited storage space). So, we use 8" cast iron skillets, which also serve other cool purposes as well (pizza, Japanese Sukiyaki, etc.).

Certain elements are sauteed in beef tallow (from our Insta-Pot Pot Roast), and set aside for later assembly. Then, a nice layer of leftover rice is laid on top of the hot tallow. While the rest of the elements are placed in small piles around the outside of the rice surface, the bottom of the rice layer becomes crispy and golden. Once all of the element piles have been placed, an egg is fried, over easy, and placed in the center of the piles and dressed with bibimbap sauce (gochujang (Korean hot red chili paste), toasted sesame oil, sugar, water, toasted and crushed sesame seeds, rice vinegar, and minced garlic).

Here are the other elements placed on the rice, in small piles:

Leftovers from our Korean Seolleongtang Dinner: beef shank meat (chopped and marinaded in soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, sugar and minced garlic), kkakdugi, fish cake banchan, and kongnamul.

Thin slivers of yellow onion, shiitake mushrooms, and carrot, each dusted with sea salt and sauteed in the beef tallow.

This was washed down with some nice cold iced coffee.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 
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pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Japanese Udon, Etc.

This happens more and more to me lately. I woke up this morning with this idea hanging before my eyes. Let's just say that I had no choice but to comply.

First, some nice edamame: young soy bean pods, steamed and dusted with sea salt flakes.

Next, Shoyu Tamago: hard-boiled eggs, marinaded in boiled mushroom-infused soy sauce, and sliced thin.

Next, locally grown purple asparagus, drizzled with a nice dressing (olive oil, sushi vinegar, mayonnaise, sea salt, and fresh-ground black pepper).

The broth for Udon is the key to the whole show. It is simple and easy to make. The core ingredients are so ubiquitous in Japan that most folks can make it with their eyes tied behind their back. My broth is made with dashi (a broth made from kombu (a kind of kelp), dried shiitake mushrooms, and katsuobushi (shavings of dried bonito fish)), mirin (a sweet rice cooking wine), sake (rice wine suitable for drinking), sugar, mushroom-infused soy sauce, and a splash of Thai fish sauce.

Now the assembled Udon: prepared udon noodles, cross cut young Napa cabbage, chopped scallions, thin-sliced re-hydrated shiitake mushrooms, kamaboko (Japanese fish cake),and sliced carrot, all arranged nicely in a bowl with hot udon broth poured on top. This is then dressed with shichimi (a Japanese 7-spice mixture).

This was all washed down with an ice-cold bottle of Hakutsuru Superior Junmai Ginjo sake.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Pad Gra Tiem Gai

This is a very simple, yet tasty entree. I know I don't usually do simple, but I was too lazy to head out to the grocer tonight. This dish is very heavy on the garlic and ground black pepper, but the cooking method and ingredients work together so that it turns out very tasty but not overpowering.

Pad Gra Tiem Gai (Thai Garlic Pepper Chicken): cubed chicken thigh meat, chunked mini-sweet peppers (red and orange), palm sugar, minced garlic, fresh-ground black pepper, Thai fish sauce (Flying Lion brand), peanut oil, water, chopped cilantro, and scallion segments. This is all laid upon a bed of glass noodles (mung bean threads).

This was washed down with an ice cold vodka and pink grapefruit juice.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Italian Night

I have had so much Asian food lately that it should not be surprising that I would be looking for something continental for a change of pace. The base recipe for this dish is an iconic recipe that I reverse engineered from a local Italian eatery. They call theirs "Joe's Special." As is my way, I took their dish and dialed it up a bit. The marinara sauce I used is so good, I could put it upon just about anything. I have tasted no other brand that comes even close.

First, some tasty garlic toast.

Next, some Italian meatballs (Chef Bruce Aidells brand, "Italian Style Chicken Meatballs"), sauteed in olive oil and the juice from sauteing the sliced mushrooms used below.

Finally, my Baked Spaghetti Special: thin spaghetti (Barilla brand), tossed with a combination of minced-sauteed garlic, fresh ground black pepper, sea salt, and olive oil. A nice layer of sliced mozzarella cheese is laid on top of the plated spaghetti. Sliced Crimini mushrooms are sauteed in olive oil and sea salt and layered upon the cheese layer. A cover of marinara sauce (Del'Amore brand, "Spicy Recipe") is placed on top of this already beautiful stack of goodness. The results are baked just so, and decorated with some fresh parsley from out back..

In keeping with the spirit of this dinner, mine was washed down with an ice cold Peroni. Our guest decided on an ice cold Blue Moon Lager.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

GuyK

Junior Member
Italian Night

I have had so much Asian food lately that it should not be surprising that I would be looking for something continental for a change of pace. The base recipe for this dish is an iconic recipe that I reverse engineered from a local Italian eatery. They call theirs "Joe's Special." As is my way, I took their dish and dialed it up a bit. The marinara sauce I used is so good, I could put it upon just about anything. I have tasted no other brand that comes even close.

First, some tasty garlic toast.

Next, some Italian meatballs (Chef Bruce Aidells brand, "Italian Style Chicken Meatballs"), sauteed in olive oil and the juice from sauteing the sliced mushrooms used below.

Finally, my Baked Spaghetti Special: thin spaghetti (Barilla brand), tossed with a combination of minced-sauteed garlic, fresh ground black pepper, sea salt, and olive oil. A nice layer of sliced mozzarella cheese is laid on top of the plated spaghetti. Sliced Crimini mushrooms are sauteed in olive oil and sea salt and layered upon the cheese layer. A cover of marinara sauce (Del'Amore brand, "Spicy Recipe") is placed on top of this already beautiful stack of goodness. The results are baked just so, and decorated with some fresh parsley from out back..

In keeping with the spirit of this dinner, mine was washed down with an ice cold Peroni. Our guest decided on an ice cold Blue Moon Lager.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
Your meals always look mighty tasty, but I invariably seem to get lost at the mushrooms.
 

Celt

Peanut Head
Today was a busy day for me...so I went to Wendy's to try one of their new salads. I got romaine lettuce, grilled chicken breast, grape tomatoes, Italian cheeses, crunchy Parmesan crisps, and creamy Caesar dressing. It was quite good!

 

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