Havenite Food Creations

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Mongolian Beef

You ever ask your beloved what she wants for dinner, and she comes back with what do you want? Yeah. Right. So,,,I went through our catalog, and selected 3 good candidates for dinner, then I asked her what she would like from those. She still tried the duck, but I said I already selected...these 3. So...Mongolian beef was chosen.

First, Thai Coleslaw: sliced Napa cabbage, snow peas, chopped cilantro, chopped mint, minced jalapeno pepper, thin-sliced radishes, coarse-chopped cashews, lime juice, sugar, Vietnamese fish sauce, and coconut milk.

Finally, the Mongolian Beef: thin-sliced rib steak, marinaded in a special sauce (mushroom infused soy sauce, cornstarch, and peanut oil), broccoli florets, cubed red bell pepper, chopped scallions, ginger-garlic paste, in a special sauce (mushroom-infused soy sauce, brown sugar, sweet chili sauce (Mae Ploy brand), mirin (Japanese sweet rice cooking wine), Hoisin sauce (a ubiquitous Chinese sauce), Himalayan salt, coarse-ground Chinese white pepper, cornstarch, and Sriracha (garlic chili sauce). This was dressed with chopped scallions and toasted-crushed sesame seeds, and served on a bed of fried mung bean threads.

This was all washed down with an ice-cold Shock Top.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Preparing to Dive into Ethiopian Food

Seeing folks working with Ethiopian ingredients, moved me to go in that direction as well. I will say that I was quite intimidated, and remain so, after my first foray. Before preparing my first Ethiopian meal, I needed to locate or prepare a couple of ubiquitous ingredients. One I made fresh, and one was prepared fresh by my local, recently discovered North African grocer.

First, the ingredient I bought, as it is prepared fresh daily, Berbere Spice. All of this is finely ground into something nice for the eye and tongue: fenugreek seeds, dried red chiles (likely Aleppo peppers), paprika, sea salt, ground ginger, onion powder, ground cardamom, ground coriander, ground nutmeg, garlic powder, ground cloves, ground cinnamon, and ground allspice. If you make your own, make plenty, because plenty is used in Ethiopian entrees.

Now for what I made fresh, Niter Kibbeh (a heavily spiced clarified butter or ghee). A large amount of unsalted butter, simmered on very low, for 90 minutes, with beaucoup spices, then strained through fine cheesecloth. Here are the spices: chopped yellow onion, minced garlic, minced ginger, cinnamon stick, cracked black peppercorns, crushed black cardamom pods, cloves, fenugreek seeds, coriander seeds, dried oregano, cumin seeds, ground nutmeg, and ground turmeric.



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Enjoy,
Rich P
 
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pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Ethiopian Night

As I stated above, in considering making an Ethiopian meal, I was greatly intimidated, and I still am. What a serious lot of work, indeed. But, it turned out pretty good for a first shot at it.

First, the Injera (Ethiopian flat bread): In for a penny, in for a pound, and knowing that all-teff injera can be finicky, I still went for it. This stuff is an art, in the fermenting and in the making. Our local North African grocer (recently discovered) had dark teff, so that is what we used. Normally, you take the finely ground teff and add water to it to a soupy consistency, and let it sit for 4 days or so, so it ferments with wild yeasts from the air around you. I did not want to wait that long, so I waited 8 hours after adding in commercial yeast. That was not enough time for it to develop the slightly sour, complex flavor, but it was good enough for a first run at it. I used a small cast iron skillet. Consistency of the batter and temperature of the pan took some experimentation, but we did well enough. I now have a batch that is fermenting for just over a day, and I will let it go for a full 4 and try again.

And now for the entrees...

First, Misir Wat (Spiced Red Lentils): red lentils, niter kibbeh (spiced ghee), olive oil, chopped red onions, minced garlic, minced ginger, berbere (Ethiopian spice mix), nigella seeds, ground cardamom, Himalayan salt, and fresh-ground black pepper.

Next, Atkilt Wat (Spiced Cabbage): niter kibbeh, olive oil, sliced carrots, thin-sliced onion, Himalayan salt, ground black pepper, ground cumin, ground turmeric, shredded cabbage, and cubed potatoes.

Next, Ingudai Tibs (Sauteed Mushroom Dish): niter kibbeh, olive oil, strips of green bell pepper, strips of red onion, seeded and dices tomatoes, quartered Crimini mushrooms, berbere (Ethiopian spice mix), minced garlic, lemon juice Himalayan salt, and chopped cilantro.

Finally, Doro Wat (Spiced Chicken): cubed chicken thigh meat (marinaded in lemon juice), niter kibbeh, olive oil, pureed yellow onions, butter, minced garlic, minced ginger, berbere, Himalayan salt, mirin (instead of unavailable Ethiopian honey wine), chicken stock and hard-boiled eggs.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Hamburger Bean Soup

This meal was prepared by my beloved bride. She got the recipe from her previous mother-in-law, and has carried to this day. I was skeptical about how good it would be, but...it was pretty tasty.

First, Hushpuppies: This was my recipe, but hers, I must admit, are better than mine (corn meal, wheat flour, chopped onions, egg, buttermilk, salt, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, vegetable oil)

Finally, Hamburger Bean Soup: sautéed ground beef, onion, bell pepper, garlic, salt, pepper, cumin, Santa Cruz chili power, canned dark and light red kidney beans, stewed tomatoes, and creamed corn.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Indonesian Chicken Satays

This was a nice, light meal, appropriate for a day where the large meal was earlier (around lunch time).

First, edammame (steamed young soy beans), dusted with fleur du sel (flaked sea salt).

Next left over rice, sauteed with butter and dusted with aonori (prepared Japanese sea weed), and black sesame seeds.

Next, the marinade for the chicken: kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce), mushroom-infused soy sauce, minced garlic, peanut oil, rice vinegar, ground cumin, and ground coriander.

Next, the satay dipping sauce: a reserved portion of the marinade, smooth peanut butter, ketchup, and sriracha (a garlic-chili sauce).

Finally, the Chicken Satays: chunks of chicken thigh meat, marinaded for several hours and skewered on bamboo skewers, then broiled to a nice caramelization.

This was washed down with some nice Japanese plum wine.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Indian Night

I woke up with a strong hankering for the meat entree of this meal. The rest I picked to go with it just right. I think each of these were the best version I made so far. One hitch was the hot oil boil over and fire that happened when I dumped the curry leaves and jalapeno chunks into the oil used to fry up the chicken. Other than losing my cool, the fire got put right out, the oil was picked up, and the dinner turned out great.

First, South Indian Sambar (a ubiquitous soup for the area): toor dal (pidgeon peas) cooked apart, peanut oil, Himalayan salt, turmeric, cumin seeds, fenugreek seeds, black mustard seeds, asafetida, curry leaves (from the tree out back), red chilies (chile de arbol), cubed tomato, green bean segments, sliced carrots, cauliflower florets, tamarind paste, and sambar powder (MTR brand).

Next, Jeera Pulau (Cumin Rice): basmati rice, ghee (clarified butter), peanut oil, cumin seeds, bay leaf, star anise, cloves, Vietnamese cinnamon stick, and Himalayan salt.

Next, Chana Masala (Spiced Chick Peas): canned chick peas (with juice), lemon juice, peanut oil, brown sugar, ground cumin, ground coriander, ground cinnamon, garam masala (a ubiquitous spice mix), ground black pepper, Aleppo pepper flakes, and Himalayan salt.

Next, Mushroom Mutter Makhani: quartered Crimini mushrooms, green peas, peanut oil, cumin seeds, chopped onions, Kashmiri chili powder, cream, garam masala, sugar, fenugreek leaves, chopped tomatoes, minced garlic, minced ginger, chopped cashew nuts, all dressed with chopped coriander.

Finally, Chicken 65 (likely #65 on the menu in the hotel in Hyderabad, where invented): cubed chicken thigh meat, marinaded and coated in in Arabic yogurt, minced garlic, minced ginger, garam masala, coriander powder, Kashmiri chili powder, corn starch, beaten egg, and Himalayan salt, then deep fried and dressed with deep fried curry leaves and chunks of jalapenos.

This was all washed down with ice-cold Smirnoff Ice (original lemon-lime).

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 
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Celt

Peanut Head
Thai Chicken and Rice Soup
In the past few days it has cooled down dramatically. It put me into the mood to make some tasty soup...so...
Cubed Roast Chicken....Wild Rice...Mushrooms....Red Pepper...Carrots...Green Chili Peppers...Green Curry...Onion...Ginger...Whole Cream....Fresh Butter...Coconut Milk...Lemongrass...

 

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pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Egg Foo Yung

This one is one of my beloved bride's favorite dishes, and a tribute to those who have enjoyed breakfast for dinner.

First, a small bowl of long grain rice.

Next, the special sauce: chicken broth, oyster sauce substitute (dark Chinese soy sauce, hoisin sauce and Vietnamese fish sauce), ketchup, mushroom-infused soy sauce, rice vinegar, and corn starch.

Finally, the Egg Foo Yung: eggs (from out back) beaten with toasted sesame oil, sea salt & black pepper; diced shiitake mushrooms; mung bean sprouts; chopped scallion whites and greens; and kosher crab (surimi).

This was washed down with some vodka and grapefruit juice.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 
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pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Back to My Roots - Red Borscht

We have not had this in a good long while, and it was time. We really groove on food from the old country, and this was no let down.

The broth for this was built, ingredient upon ingredient. Each item was simmered until done, and removed for later. Then it was all put back in and heated up for service. The broth started with a nice chicken broth. Then sequentially, cubed yellow potatoes, quartered button mushrooms, sliced turkey kielbasa, cubed turkey ham, and sliced beets.

At the time of service, the ingredients were all reassembled and heated up, then dressed with the beet juice, a healthy dollop of sour cream, slices of hard-boiled egg, chopped dill and horseradish. The borscht is shown just before stirring the sour cream all in, when the broth becomes a beautiful creamy pink.

Since I did not have any Polish beer, I settled for an ice cold Warsteiner Oktoberfest.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Mushroom and Stringbean Chicken

This one dish that has a high flavor to effort ratio. I like that some days. The special sauce pretty much takes it over the top.

First, the Ginger Soy Sauce: chicken broth, mushroom-infused soy sauce, Japanese sake (rice wine), rice vinegar, minced garlic, minced ginger, brown sugar, corn starch, and water.

Next, a small bowl of leftover long grain rice, sauteed in butter.

Finally, the Mushroom and Stringbean Chicken: cubed chicken thighs (coated with corn starch and pan fried in peanut oil), quartered button mushrooms, stringbeans, wedges of yellow onion, and soy sauce.

This was all washed down with an ice cold Smirnoff Ice.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 
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pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Chicken with Beansprouts and Snow Peas

I've been on a Chinese stir fry kick lately. I'm trying to get the feel for this cooking method, and it does indeed take a kind of feel for it. I'm not there yet, but I'm am starting to get the hang of it. Tonight's dinner is a case in point.

First, another small bowl of leftover long grain rice, sauteed in butter.

Finally, the Chicken with Beansprouts and Snow Peas: thin slices of chicken thighs (marinaded in water, peanut oil, mushroom-infused soy sauce, and corn starch), stir fried with mung bean sprouts, cubed shiitake mushrooms, diagonally sliced snow peas, sliced scallions, minced garlic, peanut oil, Japanese sake (rice wine), Hoisin sauce with Vietnamese fish sauce (oyster sauce substitute), sea salt, toasted sesame oil, fresh-ground white pepper, and corn starch.

This was appropriately washed down with an ice-cold Tsing Tao.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 
Thai Chicken and Rice Soup
In the past few days it has cooled down dramatically. It put me into the mood to make some tasty soup...so...
Cubed Roast Chicken....Wild Rice...Mushrooms....Red Pepper...Carrots...Green Chili Peppers...Green Curry...Onion...Ginger...Whole Cream....Fresh Butter...Coconut Milk...Lemongrass...

That looks awesome - I make an allrecipes.com mulligatawny-soup - that seems pretty similar.
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Breaking the Yom Kippur Fast - Japanese Otsumami

This year, the fast went fairly easy, but the thirst was an issue. Anyway, I wanted to make a variety of light fare, to ease back into the swing of normal things...

First, a small bowl of fresh Japanese short-grained rice.

Next, a bowl of simple miso soup: shiro miso paste, water, chopped scallions, and diced shiitake mushroom.

Next, edamame: steamed young soy bean pods, dusted with fleur-du-sel (sea salt flakes).

Next, kosher crab: imitation crab (surimi), warmed in brown butter, Worcestershire sauce, lime juice, and sea salt, with the sauce left for dipping.

Next, Shoyu Tamago: hard-boiled eggs, simmered in mushroom-infused soy sauce and sliced.

Finally, Teriyaki Yakitori: chunks of chicken thigh meat, marinaded in teriyaki sauce and skewered, then broiled to a nice caramelization.

This was all washed down with an ice-cold Xingu.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Thai Cashew Chicken

I am still honing my stir-fry skills and technique. They are getting better, but timing, temperature, sequence of action, etc. are still under development. Anyway, this time I broke out the wok. Even that is a bit iffy, since the wok is stainless steel instead of cast iron, and flat bottomed instead of round (I'm cooking on a ceramic cooktop stove). Progress is definitely being made.

First, Khao Pad (Thai fried rice): leftover Japanese rice (from the other night), scrambled egg, diced shiitake mushroom, minced garlic, minced ginger, chopped yellow onion, lime juice, gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes), toasted peanuts, sliced basil, sliced cilantro, chopped scallions, sea salt, and black pepper, all sauteed in peanut oil.

Finally, Thai Cashew Chicken: diced chicken thigh meat, sliced yellow onion, sliced red bell pepper, segments of scallions, cashew nuts, minced garlic, mushroom-infused soy sauce, kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce), Hoisin Sauce and Vietnamese fish sauce (oyster sauce substitute), cornstarch, gochugaru, and fresh ground white pepper.

This was all washed down with vodka and pink grapefruit juice.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

Audionut

Next Round Is On Me
Thai Cashew Chicken

I am still honing my stir-fry skills and technique. They are getting better, but timing, temperature, sequence of action, etc. are still under development. Anyway, this time I broke out the wok. Even that is a bit iffy, since the wok is stainless steel instead of cast iron, and flat bottomed instead of round (I'm cooking on a ceramic cooktop stove). Progress is definitely being made.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
I see egg in that rice, this could definitely be called breakfast! (you might be able to tell that I haven’t had mine yet...)🤤
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Real Men Do Eat Quiche

I have had a taste for quiche for quite some time. Today was the day; This was on open offer by my beloved bride, so...who could say no?

Shredded Jack Cheese, diced turkey kielbasa, chopped onion (sautéed in butter), diced button mushroom, sliced green scallion tops, eggs, sour cream, milk, sea salt, and ground black pepper.

This was washed down with some nice iced coffee.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Paidakia & Potatoes

I have been spending so much culinary effort on the Asian continent that I thought I should do some Europe for a change. I settled on Greece. This one is a favorite of mine, and it was certainly tasty. It depends upon the availability of a nice rack of lamb, which is cut into nice thin chops.

First, some fresh Iraqi samoon bread (from the halal grocer down the street).

Next, a tasty Greek salad: baby arugula, thin-sliced red onion, minced garlic, chopped kalamata olives, extra-virgin kalamata olive oil, red wine vinegar, sea salt, fresh-ground black pepper, chopped fresh dill, and crumbled feta cheese.

Next a bowl of Avgolemono (Lemon Chicken Soup): chicken broth, orzo (a rice-like pasta), sea salt, fresh-ground black pepper, and eggs (whisked together with lemon juice).

Next, Lemon Potatoes: wedges of red-skinned potatoes, minced garlic, extra-virgin kalamata olive oil, dried oregano, lemon juice, semolina, sea salt, and fresh-ground black pepper.

Finally, the Paidakia (Greek Lamb Chops): thin lamb chops (thinly sliced from the rack), marinaded in a special sauce (extra-virgin kalamata olive oil, minced garlic, whole-seed mustard, chopped French thyme, chopped fresh rosemary, dried oregano, lemon zest, and cracked black peppercorns), and roasted on top of the potatoes.

This was all washed down with an ice-cold Mythos.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Japanese Dynamite

This is a favorite around these parts. Another plus is that we get to try different fishes each time.

First, some steamed edammame (young soy bean pods).

Next a small bowl of fried leftover Japanese rice, with sliced scallions, black sesame seeds, and mushroom-infused soy sauce.

Next a nice broth that I made up on the fly: dashi (made of a broth from kombu (Japanese kelp) and re-hydrated shiitake mushrooms), chopped shiitake mushrooms (from the dashi makings), sauteed salmon skin (from the salmon in the dynamite), sliced kombu (from the dashi makings), mirin (Japanese cooking wine), sake (rice wine), and mushroom-infused soy sauce.

Finally, the dynamite: sliced red snapper, sliced Chilean sea bass, sections of kosher crab (surimi), sliced Crimini mushrooms, sliced Scottish salmon. All of this coated with mayonnaise, Vietnamese fish sauce, and sriracha (garlic chili sauce), then baked to a nice caramelization, and dressed with masago (capelin roe).

This was all washed down with a vodka and grapefruit juice.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 

pustelniakr

Silver Miner at Large
Staff member
Thai: Pad Gratiem Gai

This is a definite favorite around these parts. As far as stir-fry goes, this one is not too demanding, and is quick, but tastes most rewarding.

First, a nice bowl of jasmine rice.

Finally, the Pad Gratiem: cubed chicken thigh meat, alot of minced garlic (around a half of a head per serving), palm sugar, fresh ground Chinese white pepper, fresh ground black pepper, Vietnamese fish sauce (Red Boat brand), peanut oil, scallion segments, short lengths of glass noodles, garnished with coarsely chopped coriander leaves.

This was all washed down with some ice cold pink grapefruit juice and vodka.

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Enjoy,
Rich P
 
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