Hi Fi hostas?

I figure we have some hosta lovers here and thought I would start a thread before they start poking through the ground. Mine end up getting munched by deer after a month or two/when I stop peeing on them but they sure are fun while they last. Im gonna try to keep them around longer this year. 😁 I lost track of what is what but Ive probably got 15 varieties or so. Love this time of year. :)


Please post your hosta pics here.
 

kirk57

Junior Member
They aren't up yet here, but the joke between my wife and me is that the Hosta is the unofficial plant of Chicago's (leafy) North Shore. They do well in shady areas.

I think we have three varieties on our plot. One is all green, one verigated and one has very large verigated leaves. Bees love the flowers in the fall!
 

John Frum

Secret Society Member
Our front bed had hostas when we moved in, and we got a good deal more from a neighbor. Unfortunately, they’ve been dwindling every year since we took out the tree that was shading them.

In the back, our shade is already chock full of native plants, so it appears we’ll be hosta-less for the foreseeable future.
 

Fran604g

Just Call Me Junior
Sharon and I have been growing hostas here for almost 4 decades. We began with Giant Blues and a couple variegated species, then continued adding other varieties which put us at around 10, I'd guess. So far the deer haven't found them, but this late-winter they sure did love our Rhody and Azaleas...🤬
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
Hostas are hard to kill (although easy to torture) -- i.e., we adopted hostas as part of our landscaping-of-last-resort long ago! ;)
We're not really green thumbs, Mrs. H and I.
The deer avoid the hostas in front of our (current) house until late in the season -- although I do spray 'em liberally with various and sundry deer repellent potions (e.g., Plantskydd, which is pretty good... although it makes the sprayed area look kind of like a grisly murder scene!).

We had hostas along the north wall (garage wall) of our old house in MA, where they gamely clung to life. :)

mr slim in situ MA house 3.2 by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
You can see one of them at the left corner of the garage in the old photo above.

Let's see if I can find any hosta piccies from NH ...

well... you can sorta see 'em, up by the front of the house.
The hostas we have here were the very kind gift of our neighbors down the hill the first year we were here full time -- they also gave us some some lovely bleeding hearts.

DSC_1615 by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
 
I have hostas in the backyard that were here when I arrived. I haven't cared whether they were in the sun or shaded, but they've grown immensely over the years. I've chopped off multiple chunks of the larger patches and planted them elsewhere in the yard, and those have all grown a lot. The front yard, same deal--I broke up a few clumps and spread them out, and they now surround half of the porch.

Can't seem to kill 'em, in other words.

Daylilies are the same. There were some when I got here. I split a few up. I also picked up some from the local freecycle list. So everything on this lot in terms of perennials are all free. Neither are my first choice in foliage but since we're not staying here much longer, as long as it looks presentable, its all good.
 

Wntrmute2

Not So Mediocre Member
Hostas are hard to kill (although easy to torture) -- i.e., we adopted hostas as part of our landscaping-of-last-resort long ago! ;)
We're not really green thumbs, Mrs. H and I.
The deer avoid the hostas in front of our (current) house until late in the season -- although I do spray 'em liberally with various and sundry deer repellent potions (e.g., Plantskydd, which is pretty good... although it makes the sprayed area look kind of like a grisly murder scene!).

We had hostas along the north wall (garage wall) of our old house in MA, where they gamely clung to life. :)

mr slim in situ MA house 3.2 by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
You can see one of them at the left corner of the garage in the old photo above.

Let's see if I can find any hosta piccies from NH ...

well... you can sorta see 'em, up by the front of the house.
The hostas we have here were the very kind gift of our neighbors down the hill the first year we were here full time -- they also gave us some some lovely bleeding hearts.

DSC_1615 by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
Love the metal roof. We looked into doing that just last year but the cost was 5 X of a good shingle job.
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
Metal's the way to go up here, mostly because they self-shed snow.
About half of the houses in this vicinity have "standing seam" (metal) roofs -- despite the famous Yankee frugality.
Beats a cave-in ;)

Our hostas were, as I implied, dug up by a neighbor who was being over-run with them.
Wish we could get the daylilies here to spread. I love them. We have some but I'd be thrilled to have more.
 
Wish we could get the daylilies here to spread. I love them. We have some but I'd be thrilled to have more.
I'm not too fond of the freebies I got since they are tall and gangly, where the others are more well-behaved. Planted in the front yard, they are crowding out a dark maroon daylily I would prefer to keep. We also have one that is an interesting peach color. I may move some of these around in the next couple of weeks, before they start growing much taller.

I also have to paint the house outside, so I also need to do that soon since there will be nothing growing that is in the way.
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
heh, I finally found a photo of some of 'em. This is from June 2019. There's basically a mirror image of these two flavors of hosta on either side of the front door.
You can see the bleeding hearts, too.
I can't remember if we dug up these irises from our old house, or our daughter dug 'em up at her old house (in Keene, NH). :p
DSC_4975.JPG

DSC_5019.JPG

We're just happy to have something growing out there! :)
 
Saw my first hosta pips today but did not snap a pic. They are starting to poke through the ground in Columbus.
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
I haven't looked yet.
I did notice today that the deersies have already nibbled on some of the bed of tulips I carefully planted last fall (and laced with a fertilizer/animal repellent called "Milorganite"* that was recommended to me). :( Bastards. Rascals.
I doused 'em with Plantskydd today. The tulips, that is -- not the deer. Bastards. Rascals.
;)

___________________
* As you might know/I might have mentioned, Milorganite is a highly processed byproduct of Milwaukee (human) sewage treatment :confused: :). It is pelletized stuff with an interesting bouquet. :confused: :rolleyes:

 
I can relate very much on both counts. 🤣 🤬

There are a lot of deer here. Every day I see about 10, sometimes more. They have their routine, just like the ducks. They traaaashed my conifers this winter. 🤬

Yes they love tulips. Ive been planting tulips for 8 years, they dont last long. I also planted about 10-20 last fall and most seem to be coming up, but about half have already gotten munched.🤬
 
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mhardy6647

Señor Member
Thanks to my hifi/IRL buddy @forkliftman15 (and his family!) I acquired a large number of nice, field grown tulip bulbs from a place in RI for a very modest cost. We have had bad luck with tulips due to both deer and chipmunks; the Milorganite gambit gave us some hope. It's still a little too early to write off the experiment. It's also not too late to erect an electric fence around the bed! :redface:
 

airdronian

Radar Member
Tulips in a Hosta thread ? Why not. Last year when the front garden bed was enlarged and replanted, the existing tulips were split and relocated. I'll be damned if they haven't responded well to this. Hopefully lots of blooms in May. Earlier if warm, we'll see.
 
Looking out the back door, the hostas don't seem to have popped yet, but the daylilies are about four inches high. I am going to shift some of those around this year, as I had some tall orange ones in front that bullied their way through the others that I like better. Got many clumps of them throughout the yard, so I have my choice.

I miss having tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, etc., and really miss the rhododendron bushes my mother uses to have. Maybe at my next house, where we'll settle in permanently. (Provided we're not in an area that's too hot/dry to grow these things.) My yard across town looked like the previous owners had an unlimited budget at the nursery, but one thing they did right was plant a variety of flowers and shrubs so that the property almost always had something blooming.
 
Thanks to my hifi/IRL buddy @forkliftman15 (and his family!) I acquired a large number of nice, field grown tulip bulbs from a place in RI for a very modest cost. We have had bad luck with tulips due to both deer and chipmunks; the Milorganite gambit gave us some hope. It's still a little too early to write off the experiment. It's also not too late to erect an electric fence around the bed! :redface:
all 3 bags (150 bulbs--except one) in my garden ended up as vole food over the winter. The sole bulb that survived ended up as rabbit food last week.
 

Andyman

Junior Member
We've been weeding out the intruders in various garden areas here and have notice the hosta spikes in plenty. FWIW, the tulips have bloomed, the iris leaves are maybe halfway up, little grape hyacinths have bloomed and we have lots of little blue flowers too.
And the damn chives have made their presence in the uncut lawn here. I've dug some up, but will mow today and once cut they will blend.

Popped out some dandelions too but the purple nettle is flourishing too, that needs a spray.
 
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