How to compensate for reduced hearing in one ear.

It could be a blown eardrum. As an audiophile and industry guy with hearing issues (half deaf in one ear, blown eardrum in the other) I can tell you once you figure out the issue, you can find a way around it. In the end, you might be able to appreciate higher quality sound even better. Because of my own issues I’ve learned to listen much more intently and in return help others progress further with their own system.
 

Thermionics

Post Whore In Training
Those of us that are older and have ringing in our ears warn the younger generation to protect their ears, but they don’t seem to listen.
Yeah - I took my 15-year-old nephew many years back to a Motörhead concert at Showbox SODO (basically a big cinder-block tube). I tried to get him to wear earplugs, but he refused. I found out after the concert that the SPL was 123dB at the mixing console. Needless to say, his hearing was shot for about 4 days. My hearing was fine (although my internal organs felt vaguely pummeled).
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Yeah - I took my 15-year-old nephew many years back to a Motörhead concert at Showbox SODO (basically a big cinder-block tube). I tried to get him to wear earplugs, but he refused. I found out after the concert that the SPL was 123dB at the mixing console. Needless to say, his hearing was shot for about 4 days. My hearing was fine (although my internal organs felt vaguely pummeled).
I had a similar experience at a My Bloody Valentine concert a few years ago. It was one of the only shows where I wore earplugs and I still ended up putting a concrete roof support between me and the band. I've hated the band since, as I know they permanently damaged the hearing of probably a few hundred people that night.

Still, I had the 4-days of dimmed hearing when I was kid as I did a lot of shows up close by the PA, and I'm worried that that my hearing doesn't dim as much now.. and I know I have some degree of high frequency loos. I think if my hearing suddenly returned to what it was when I was 16 I'd be totally shocked at the difference.

@StevenZ I hope it's temporary. Do see an ENT as soon as you can as if it is something bad like all things the sooner you take action the better the outcome is likely to be. I have friends who I don't ever see on the 4th because of something that happened a few years ago that was similar and absolutely irresponsible.
 

Thermionics

Post Whore In Training
I had a similar experience at a My Bloody Valentine concert a few years ago. It was one of the only shows where I wore earplugs and I still ended up putting a concrete roof support between me and the band. I've hated the band since, as I know they permanently damaged the hearing of probably a few hundred people that night.

Still, I had the 4-days of dimmed hearing when I was kid as I did a lot of shows up close by the PA, and I'm worried that that my hearing doesn't dim as much now.. and I know I have some degree of high frequency loos. I think if my hearing suddenly returned to what it was when I was 16 I'd be totally shocked at the difference.

@StevenZ I hope it's temporary. Do see an ENT as soon as you can as if it is something bad like all things the sooner you take action the better the outcome is likely to be. I have friends who I don't ever see on the 4th because of something that happened a few years ago that was similar and absolutely irresponsible.
Oh, I can totally see MBV exploding eardrums right & left. I have a co-worker who is a huge fan (and audiophile) and his hearing ain't what it used to be.

In spite of my tinnitus, I can still hear up to somewhere around 18kHz so I'm not doing too bad at age 52.
 
@Steven Z, This is a great thread...
We all hope this clears up naturally and quickly.

If needed, the Otolaryngologist (ENT Dr.) only needs a licensed audiologist on staff. A real Doctor of Audiology would be my recommendation.

Wherever you start, the hearing test is free, once a year. It is probably a good idea to ask for a copy of the computer printout of your frequency responses.

While the ENT doctors are usually set up to diagnose internal ear problems, the AUD Audiologist will probably be more equipped to set you up with some unbelievably good, if not fantastically bionic, hearing aids. Hearing aids have come a long way, over the past decade, with constant progress.

Concerts used to cause my tinnitus, but then, as a younger lad, it went away within hours, a few days at most. For the last twenty or so years, my tinnitus is constant, with a cacophony of whistles and tizzes all the time. Some days, it's lower in level, but constant tinnitus means the whistles and tizzes represent where your actual loss is. So, if you hear a constant whistle, hovering at say 2KHz, guess what ? That ear or those ears have loss near 2KHz.

This is why doctors of audiology are needed. They are more equipped to know which tools (like which exceptional hearing aids) will help each of our unique aural needs.

There are hearing aids which many fine musicians with fine ears use. There are hearing aids which brought back my 3D hearing abilities, lost during 31 years working in building construction.

One day, with atypical hammer drilling going on nearby, earplugs unavailable from my toolbox or the shop, I went for some rolled up napkins for some help. The next day, the whistling never went away....With some good, no, great aids, plus an understanding and capable audiologist, once the "baseline" freq. response corrections are made, the right aids can produce more enjoyable music listening. Plus, you might not have to ask your loved ones to repeat what they say so often....

Steven Z and fellow serious music listeners suffering from hearing irregularities:
Best of luck, fate and may the good forces line up for all...
 

StevenZ

Pending Gold Star Member
@Steven Z, This is a great thread...
We all hope this clears up naturally and quickly.

If needed, the Otolaryngologist (ENT Dr.) only needs a licensed audiologist on staff. A real Doctor of Audiology would be my recommendation.

Wherever you start, the hearing test is free, once a year. It is probably a good idea to ask for a copy of the computer printout of your frequency responses.

While the ENT doctors are usually set up to diagnose internal ear problems, the AUD Audiologist will probably be more equipped to set you up with some unbelievably good, if not fantastically bionic, hearing aids. Hearing aids have come a long way, over the past decade, with constant progress.

Concerts used to cause my tinnitus, but then, as a younger lad, it went away within hours, a few days at most. For the last twenty or so years, my tinnitus is constant, with a cacophony of whistles and tizzes all the time. Some days, it's lower in level, but constant tinnitus means the whistles and tizzes represent where your actual loss is. So, if you hear a constant whistle, hovering at say 2KHz, guess what ? That ear or those ears have loss near 2KHz.

This is why doctors of audiology are needed. They are more equipped to know which tools (like which exceptional hearing aids) will help each of our unique aural needs.

There are hearing aids which many fine musicians with fine ears use. There are hearing aids which brought back my 3D hearing abilities, lost during 31 years working in building construction.

One day, with atypical hammer drilling going on nearby, earplugs unavailable from my toolbox or the shop, I went for some rolled up napkins for some help. The next day, the whistling never went away....With some good, no, great aids, plus an understanding and capable audiologist, once the "baseline" freq. response corrections are made, the right aids can produce more enjoyable music listening. Plus, you might not have to ask your loved ones to repeat what they say so often....

Steven Z and fellow serious music listeners suffering from hearing irregularities:
Best of luck, fate and may the good forces line up for all...
Thank you for sharing this. I have an appointment coming up in a few days where they do indeed have an audiologist on staff so hopefully I can get it all sorted relatively quickly. I will keep you guys updated.

As for my right ear, it has gotten slightly better in the past couple of days... I think. I still get odd drop outs and it's a little painful at times if I listen to music for a while, even at very low volumes. Most of my day is spent in silence and when I get home I need to remind all 3 of my children to stay quiet as it can be a bit painful to hear them even just laughing which breaks my heart. Same with earpods. I typically pop in the Apple AirPods at night after the kids go down and even at low volumes it's unbearable. That said, I've made progress, or my ears have adjusted so hopefully we can remedy the pain issue and move forward.
 

StevenZ

Pending Gold Star Member
Quick update. Inner ear concussion, no hearing loss, no damage and full recovery expected in time. However the tinnitus could be permanent. Since the tinnitus is minor and comes and goes I’m not too terribly worried about it. So clean bill of health and my hearing is still intact. I dodged a bullet on this one.
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Quick update. Inner ear concussion, no hearing loss, no damage and full recovery expected in time. However the tinnitus could be permanent. Since the tinnitus is minor and comes and goes I’m not too terribly worried about it. So clean bill of health and my hearing is still intact. I dodged a bullet on this one.
That’s great. Very happy for you and your hearing!
 
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