MEADOWLARK AUDIO SHOP PICS

I thought I'd post, from time to time, some pics showing what's happening on the shop floor and on the design bench.

We are enjoying a decent stack of sold orders that's keeping us happily busy, plus a bit of new product dev.

For starters, here are some of the incoming parts: drivers and amps. The white cartons in the middle are nineteen Hypex Fusion plate amps, comprising several denominations.

The 500x500Watters go into the dual 10" pump LF systems. 100x500x500W for the Ibis and Nightingale (upper cabinet) and matching Center Channel, 100x250x250W for the soon-to-be introduced Kingfisher and her sister design, the Meadowlark Harrier Classic. The 100x125x125W is for Kite, wherein we strap the 125s to a single 250W channel. Plus a few 125x125W for a custom one-off Dolby ATMOS overhead effects speakers that take the Esoteric 7" and Seas 27s .


20200717_081023.jpg
 
Nightingale circa 1996. The three chassis, five driver, four way that rocked the place:

nightingale 1996.jpg

Two guys recently asked for a modern edition, put up the dough. So Nightingale v2. Two chassis to avoid building the "unliftable". Note that, leveraging the wonders of DSP, we've PACKED the baffle with as much driver as possible. Note the nicely non-rectangular upper bass and midrange enclosures. The shop pair is in the clamps right now.


nightingale cad.jpg
 

Audionut

Next Round Is On Me
Nightingale circa 1996. The three chassis, five driver, four way that rocked the place:

View attachment 26385

Two guys recently asked for a modern edition, put up the dough. So Nightingale v2. Two chassis to avoid building the "unliftable". Note that, leveraging the wonders of DSP, we've PACKED the baffle with as much driver as possible. Note the nicely non-rectangular upper bass and midrange enclosures. The shop pair is in the clamps right now.


View attachment 26384
Unliftable.........curious as to the weight of each piece?
 
Unliftable.........curious as to the weight of each piece?
Don't know, yet. Have to finish them and see. To me there's a huge difference between a 100 lb speaker and a 200 pounder. One needs to be able to manage it during production; if two guys have to strain, you end up screwing it up. Just moving a 200 lb thing in and out of the shipping crate can be fatal.

Anyway, breaking it in two opens the opportunity to elastically decouple the modules.

Plus, we need to be able to get the uppers in and out of the vacuum press when applying the veneer. So, yeah, it must be manageable.

The driver set alone tips the scales pretty badly. Lots o' motor for lots o' force. :D
 
The first round in a series of glue-ups. Five sides are joined, leaving one side removable so that we can do the successive rounds in which we install the guts. The waxed paper at each corner is a glue resist.

20200811_142620.jpg

That's the slender body of the new Kingfisher. 8Wx12Dx40H. The prototypes are running in my lab, and I must say: I can't tear myself away from them.

Because we'll later saw large tapered chamfers into the baffle, we use a special pinner that shoots composite pins rather than steel.

20200812_133721.jpg
 

Audionut

Next Round Is On Me
The first round in a series of glue-ups. Five sides are joined, leaving one side removable so that we can do the successive rounds in which we install the guts. The waxed paper at each corner is a glue resist.

View attachment 26405

That's the slender body of the new Kingfisher. 8Wx12Dx40H. The prototypes are running in my lab, and I must say: I can't tear myself away from them.

Because we'll later saw large tapered chamfers into the baffle, we use a special pinner that shoots composite pins rather than steel.

View attachment 26406
Wow, I didn’t know those nail guns existed! (But then again I have been out of the game a long time). I don’t miss when you cut through a Brad nail and sparks or shards of metal went flying! That and you ruin your blade over time.
 
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Wow, I didn’t know those nail guns existed! (But then again I have been out of the game a long time). I miss when you cut through a Brad nail and sparks or shards of metal went flying! That and you ruin your blade over time.
Yeah, hate that. We run Forrests, send 'em back to Tony for sharpening, so we want to be kind to them. The composite pins are costly, but worth it.
 

prime minister

Site Owner
Staff member
The first round in a series of glue-ups. Five sides are joined, leaving one side removable so that we can do the successive rounds in which we install the guts. The waxed paper at each corner is a glue resist.

View attachment 26405

That's the slender body of the new Kingfisher. 8Wx12Dx40H. The prototypes are running in my lab, and I must say: I can't tear myself away from them.

Because we'll later saw large tapered chamfers into the baffle, we use a special pinner that shoots composite pins rather than steel.

View attachment 26406

You have the coolest toys.
 

GuyK

Junior Member
Yeah, hate that. We run Forrests, send 'em back to Tony for sharpening, so we want to be kind to them. The composite pins are costly, but worth it.

I've thought aout using composite pins for a couple projects, but managed to find work-arounds. I didn't know you needed a different driver for them.
 
I've thought aout using composite pins for a couple projects, but managed to find work-arounds. I didn't know you needed a different driver for them.
Yeah, I didn't either, tried the pins in my std gun and found out. The gun only cost 225, but a little box of 2000 pins costs 45. So you'd only use them where you need them. For these carcasses, just the baffles.

We pin sparingly, anyway, just enough to arrest the slipping and sliding that happens when you're attempting to make eight miters align at the same time. The first time you attempt that, it's....umm....interesting.
 
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