MEADOWLARK AUDIO SHOP PICS

I noticed the wax paper in your glue ups, what’s the application?
Good question. Yeah these glue ups are a bit laborious.

It's not really possible to do all of the internals in a single glue up. Depending on the complexity it can take two, three or four cycles. But the sixth, and last,, panel needs to be in place during the process to assure proper alignment of all of the guts. We just need to avoid accidentally gluing it in place. The wax paper works nicely as a glue resist.

The trick is to not have leaks between the chambers. So we have to keep a sharp eye on all of the fits and glue lines. And each speaker has to be designed so that we can address any leaks that survive the build, and show up at QC.

You really do not want the woofer modulating the midrange thru a leak; they're doing different things and at different times. Any leak to the amp chamber is gonna detune the alignment plus make noise.
 

Wntrmute2

Junior Member
I love the attention to the science as well as the art. I'm guessing that is infrequently done. There are usually craftsmen and there are scientists/technicians but the two infrequently come together. I'm impressed.
 
I love the attention to the science as well as the art. I'm guessing that is infrequently done. There are usually craftsmen and there are scientists/technicians but the two infrequently come together. I'm impressed.
We have attention to science (Engineering) and art (Design Office) in the automotive industry, but it is an adversarial relationship. Engineering thinks the designers in Design Office are a bunch of prima donna's that wouldn't recognize a brake caliper or a Engine Control Module if it bit them in the ass, and Design Office believes engineers are jut a bunch of techno-geeks who have no vision of what actually sells a car or truck.
 
We have attention to science (Engineering) and art (Design Office) in the automotive industry, but it is an adversarial relationship. Engineering thinks the designers in Design Office are a bunch of prima donna's that wouldn't recognize a brake caliper or a Engine Control Module if it bit them in the ass, and Design Office believes engineers are jut a bunch of techno-geeks who have no vision of what actually sells a car or truck.
In corporate speakers, the marketing guys outline the product line up and price points, which backs up into the build costs. The cosmetics guys tussle with the engineers over sharing those numbers. Of course the cosmetics guys are at odds with the industrial engineering guys, who have to figure out how to actually make the stuff the cosmetics guys draw, so there is always upward pressure on their "half" of the equation. The marketing guys tend to side with the cosmetic guys, the visual being so much more sexy, usually leaving the engineers disappointed. Once the design dust settles, the bean counters take their swipe at the BOM and, you guessed it, the casualties are the internal parts that the customer cannot see. Each concession, by itself, may be small, but the sum comes up pondwater.

I'm not complaining. All of that crap and politics is what leaves the door wide open to the small guys, who have to entertain the same arguments, but they all happen inside of one man's head. It's so much easier to stay on target when you don't have to negotiate everything.
 
In corporate speakers, the marketing guys outline the product line up and price points, which backs up into the build costs. The cosmetics guys tussle with the engineers over sharing those numbers. Of course the cosmetics guys are at odds with the industrial engineering guys, who have to figure out how to actually make the stuff the cosmetics guys draw, so there is always upward pressure on their "half" of the equation. The marketing guys tend to side with the cosmetic guys, the visual being so much more sexy, usually leaving the engineers disappointed. Once the design dust settles, the bean counters take their swipe at the BOM and, you guessed it, the casualties are the internal parts that the customer cannot see. Each concession, by itself, may be small, but the sum comes up pondwater.

I'm not complaining. All of that crap and politics is what leaves the door wide open to the small guys, who have to entertain the same arguments, but they all happen inside of one man's head. It's so much easier to stay on target when you don't have to negotiate everything.
Sounds very much the same. Although we have the added dimension of government regulations for fuel economy and emissions that drive cost into the powertrain components, both mechanical and electrical. Where we in engineering have the most issue with design is when they come up with concepts that are just not feasible for either manufacturing in a cost effective manner, or made road worthy (again due to cost). Design Office hates being told it can't be done. And sometimes engineering is forced into decisions that are not for the best in order to appease marketing. Now if we had the budget that some of the small exotic car manufacturers have, we would say no less often.
 
Regs, you have my sympathy. I was stunned by a statement made, on camera, by a Senator espousing her position on raising the CAFE standards. Paraphrasing: "I see no reason why large SUVs can't get the same mileage as small cars."

You auto guys don't have a secret work-around for F=MA that you're not telling the rest of us about, do you? Speaking of "non-Newtonian"!

In audio, they pretty much leave us alone. About ten years ago there was talk about limiting us to 90dB. Health and safety, don't you know? It didn't go anywhere, thank goodness. My dad spent his engineering career in TV, now that was another story.
 
Random thought Pat and I dont even know if this would be beneficial, but I do know you are using your custom "peeps" sound deadening/dampening material at least in some models you make(and Im guessing all). At some point after the cabinets are finished (or perhaps before) but before you put in your "peeps" dampening material (and I see you also have horizontal layers of dampening material so before that as well), would coating internal surfaces with something softer than MDF be beneficial by also helping make the internals "less lively"? I was thinking stuff like "Flex Seal spray rubber in a can as seen on TV" (good stuff but expensive), though much cheaper and similar marine stuff that is painted on, and can more than likely also be sprayed on, can also be used. Im thinking a softer "final surface the internal sound waves" hit could additionally improve the sound, but Im not sure how much since you've already got at least 2 sound dampening materials, Im just not sure what % of the internals are covered with one or the other so Im not sure how much it would help. Or maybe it is just a bad idea, but it came to mind and seemed like a good idea to me. Thanks!

// In thinking about this more, now Im thinking hardness differences bw a "spray rubber" and MDF are not enough to have much effect on final sound. In other words, a sound wave will still reflect "97ish% as well off spray on "rubber" vs. MDF". Or something like that.
 
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