MEADOWLARK AUDIO SHOP PICS

Drugolf

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Looking great!
Tell Meagan though, no open toe shoes in the shop.

Hey Pat, just a woodworking cabinet question. Since you are veneering these boxes, why still do a 45 miter joint?
Great idea with the additional width on the bottom.
 

Pat McGinty

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Looking great!
Tell Meagan though, no open toe shoes in the shop.

Hey Pat, just a woodworking cabinet question. Since you are veneering these boxes, why still do a 45 miter joint?
Great idea with the additional width on the bottom.
Yeah, no open toe shoes. But that wasn't a work day, just a glam shot session on the weekend. No flip flops, loose hair, no snaggable jewelry, mandatory hearing and eye protection. No risky procedures. We're really good at not getting hurt.

We do miter joints to avoid glue line telegraphing by moving the glue line to the edge. If you do butt joints with 3/4" or 1" MDF, they will eventually become apparent when the surface happens to be arranged to show a reflection.

Avoiding the "appearance" of glue lines is tricky. Back when we were a production shop, I invented an easy to execute in CNC joint ((and named it after myself ;) ha ha)) that avoided the appearance of glue lines, without the pita of miters, by moving the line to less than 1/4" from the edge - where the eye just can't pick it up. It's trick, yes, but it works really well. You can look right at it, even knowing there must be a glue line, but you can't see it.


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Pat McGinty

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Nice. That's raw veneer - wood backed?

Dont forget the roller and burnishing.
10 mil paper backed. We used curved battens to apply slightly more pressure at the center than along the edges. That lets us off the hook for squeezing out any air pockets; the process just takes care of that. But you do have to keep a sharp eye out for the platten/wet veneer assy creeping off the work owning to tiny amounts of lateral bias in the clamping pressure. You do your best to set the clamp axes perpendicular to the load, but when you squeeze this hard, a small amount can show up, potentially ruining the job.
 

Pat McGinty

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I've been using contact cement on paper backed, letting it get tacky first. You prefer the titebond?
Wish I had a vac bag. At some point. Until then, only rectangular speakers.
Yeah, I just can't get the perfect flatness or the tight edge seams we're after with contact cement.

Titebond II forms a bond that's stronger than the materials you're bonding, so we never have to worry about a delam.
 
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