MEADOWLARK AUDIO SHOP PICS

Yeah carrying that stuff around and not slicing your hand...... Been mostly doing initial break down of the panels on the ground just because. Festool track saw.
 
Happy Monday morning! Time to get busy. ;)

We rarely bother with building jigs for glue up; saving that time by relying instead on our tender touch with clamps. But in this case, expecting we may have frequent need for it, we decided to make the process easier and quicker. I coated the bearing surfaces of this three sided tool with conversion varnish, then used plain, old wax paper to keep from fixing the work to it.

One side and the platform are joined, intended to force the slippery stack square, plus an opposing floater.

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One side, top, bottom, rear and baffle are joined first, with the other side left loose, but included, with wax paper intervening, to be certain that it will fit properly after the "guts" are in place and it's time for the final glue up.

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The placement of the clamp openings accommodate both the lower and upper units of this box-on-box design. The opening at rear, lower is meant for a streamer.

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Oh yeah! We did finally get off calling this thing, "baby" and named her. Raven.

Did I mention that Raven sports a bass system displacing 882cc? Or 1.764 liters / pair. Each driver has a scant 53g moving mass hung on a soft suspension, driven with 11.3 Tesla meters of force. Nobody talks like this, right? .......wonder why? ;););)
 
Looks like a convenient cubby for a Wiim Pro. How would you make those connections?
Yep, a WiiM Pro will fit inside. As always, we supply the digital interconnects. You'd have a short run of SPDIF by RG6 / RCAs from the streamer to the amp's SPDIF input. You can chose whether the other speaker gets signal by SPDIF or AES/EBU. But, unless there's some crazy reason not to, we go with AES/EBU because ,among other reasons, the wire is skinny and supple (like under the rug or cram under the baseboard skinny), and the XLR connectors lock.

FWIW - the head unit connects its two circuits from the lower unit by 4 pole XLRs, so it's fool-proof.
 
Pat, why the mitered corners when it's going to be veneered over?
Like it or not, within our current tooling, miters are needed to avoid glue line telegraphing. No matter how perfect you execute and trim a simple butt joint, eventually the glue line will be evident because the substrate is hydroscopic, hence moves a tiny weensy bit. The problem manifests when illuminated just right; two areas that should be exactly coplanar are out by a couple of thou', and you can see it in the reflection.

It's a funny thing, and a source of some head scratching. It's not unusual to see a beginner thinking he can beat it for sure, but journeymen know they can't.

In Meadowlark's prior incarnation we had the heavy tooling needed to execute a proprietary and novel joint, modestly called the "McGinty Joint", that slyly avoided the appearance of the glue line by moving it to within small fraction of an inch of the edge. The telegraphing still occurred but you just couldn't pick it up visually. It was very easy to execute in production.

Today we just run a big sliding saw so cutting accurate miters isn't a problem. The real fun ensues during clamping.
 
Like it or not, within our current tooling, miters are needed to avoid glue line telegraphing. No matter how perfect you execute and trim a simple butt joint, eventually the glue line will be evident because the substrate is hydroscopic, hence moves a tiny weensy bit. The problem manifests when illuminated just right; two areas that should be exactly coplanar are out by a couple of thou', and you can see it in the reflection.

It's a funny thing, and a source of some head scratching. It's not unusual to see a beginner thinking he can beat it for sure, but journeymen know they can't.

In Meadowlark's prior incarnation we had the heavy tooling needed to execute a proprietary and novel joint, modestly called the "McGinty Joint", that slyly avoided the appearance of the glue line by moving it to within small fraction of an inch of the edge. The telegraphing still occurred but you just couldn't pick it up visually. It was very easy to execute in production.

Today we just run a big sliding saw so cutting accurate miters isn't a problem. The real fun ensues during clamping.
Good feedback Pat. Avoiding the miter joint clamping is often foremost and center for me. I will have to inspect some previous efforts to see if I can see any of what you are saying. I do know that anything irregular under veneer will show up once you put the slightest finish on it. Like a screw head that wasn't entirely filled over and sanded correctly. Better actually if it's low.

What's funny about working with wood is the struggle to be as accurate as you can with everything only to have it shrink, expand, move, whatever because.....it's wood. Gotta hurry and get it put together and a finish applied to stop it as much as you can.
 
Also, from the clamping photo above it looks like you are going to slide the internal braces in after the fact?
Yep. I'd love to be able to make that in one glue up, but no, I don't have enough hair left to pull out.

On woodworking: back in the days of solid wood carcasses, it was critical that one plan for expansion and contraction. Depending on species, you could see 4% across the grain. In school I watched a fellow student lovingly hand-cut dovetail joints on both ends of four large panels for an armoire. It got late on Friday afternoon, so he chose to put off the glue up until Monday. You guessed it - on Monday the panels no longer fit so he was forced to saw off the joinery, and accept the now smaller dimensions.
 
Good feedback Pat. Avoiding the miter joint clamping is often foremost and center for me. I will have to inspect some previous efforts to see if I can see any of what you are saying. I do know that anything irregular under veneer will show up once you put the slightest finish on it. Like a screw head that wasn't entirely filled over and sanded correctly. Better actually if it's low.

What's funny about working with wood is the struggle to be as accurate as you can with everything only to have it shrink, expand, move, whatever because.....it's wood. Gotta hurry and get it put together and a finish applied to stop it as much as you can.
If I have to clamp mitered panels like this, I'll add something to the joint so that there is a positive registration and the panels don't move so much when slippery with glue. Splines or biscuits or running the panel through a router table set up with a lock-miter bit installed. The lock-miter bit method has the added advantage of adding glued surface area to the joint. Sometimes that's not important, sometimes that's critical. A second advantage of this method is that it is much simpler and reliable to produce for those of us without a big sliding table setup.
 
Yep. I'd love to be able to make that in one glue up, but no, I don't have enough hair left to pull out.

On woodworking: back in the days of solid wood carcasses, it was critical that one plan for expansion and contraction. Depending on species, you could see 4% across the grain. In school I watched a fellow student lovingly hand-cut dovetail joints on both ends of four large panels for an armoire. It got late on Friday afternoon, so he chose to put off the glue up until Monday. You guessed it - on Monday the panels no longer fit so he was forced to saw off the joinery, and accept the now smaller dimensions.
With some time the armoire panels could have been recovered. Either put them in a kiln or dryer room to shrink, or a moisture laden environment to expand. But that would take a couple days and CONSTANT monitoring.
 
That should look stunning. The 'flake' to which Pat refers is the result of cutting through the medullary rays when the wood is quarter-sawn. Some people call it 'fleck'.
Luthiers refer to the same effect in spruce guitar soundboards as 'bear claw'. since it resembles cross-grain scratches.

That should be subtle, yet stunning, especially with a light-coloured finish.
 
Quarter sawn? What type of finish?
Yeah quartered, that's the cut that reveals the flake. Come to think of it I can't recall ever using white oak flat cut, don't know why you would?

We usually go with just a minimal coat of water white conversion varnish for a look and feel near oiled. But I can't help but notice that guys have a preference for darkening lighter woods. Just me, no. But maybe we check into that.

We do have a nice stock of varied species, so we'll toss them on the bench and go with the gut.
Quarter sawn? What type of finish?

That should look stunning. The 'flake' to which Pat refers is the result of cutting through the medullary rays when the wood is quarter-sawn. Some people call it 'fleck'.
Luthiers refer to the same effect in spruce guitar soundboards as 'bear claw'. since it resembles cross-grain scratches.

That should be subtle, yet stunning, especially with a light-coloured finish.
Yep, the rays run radially, so you see them best when quartered. My favorite, but other guys seem to pretty much look at it and shrug, so I usually keep it to myself. But wood comes in fashion waves, so perhaps this is the time?

A while back an interior designer took me into a home, a palace really, on Mirror Lake, near Lake Placid. The flooring was quartered white oak, and rough hewn (if that's the right term for: not flat, like done with an adze then hand sanded). Gasp!
 
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