MEADOWLARK AUDIO SHOP PICS

Thanks. That's a problem with Safari. 90 degree orientation errors while somehow retaining the aspect ratio along the now incorrect axes. We can look at those jpegs in every other app and browser, and they're correct. You'd think they'd fix that? Fortunately, there is a work-around.
 
Thanks. That's a problem with Safari. 90 degree orientation errors while somehow retaining the aspect ratio along the now incorrect axes. We can look at those jpegs in every other app and browser, and they're correct. You'd think they'd fix that? Fortunately, there is a work-around.
FWIW, it was happening in Chrome mobile also, but is fixed now. I’ve had different but equally maddening issues with my own sites, dealing with the way the mobile version of a layout changes depending on the mobile device’s screen size and shape. It’s a nightmare.
 
I "fixed" the "bad" pics by making copies, renaming them as the originals, then replacing the "bad" files with the "fixed" ones. Same exact files. What gives? This has been going on for years, kinda odd for a corp with a market cap of $3T, no?

I'm running Xara Pro X, it does a decent job of making the mobile version work properly.
 
I "fixed" the "bad" pics by making copies, renaming them as the originals, then replacing the "bad" files with the "fixed" ones. Same exact files. What gives? This has been going on for years, kinda odd for a corp with a market cap of $3T, no?

I'm running Xara Pro X, it does a decent job of making the mobile version work properly.
We used to joke that NTSC (the pre-HD color TV display scheme) stood for "Never Twice the Same Color." Someone should come up with a similar thing for HTML, because it truly is "interpreted," not read, by browsers. It's a necessary evil caused by the vast number of screen sizes, aspect ratios, and resolutions out there, but man, is it ever evil! I did a job once for major national retailer that had a lab with easily 50 mobile & desktop devices set up, and a team of people just checking to make sure everything on their e-commerce site worked on all of them, with various browsers. Wix and Squarespace never mention that kind of stuff in their ads about how "easy" it is to create your own site!!
 
We used to joke that NTSC (the pre-HD color TV display scheme) stood for "Never Twice the Same Color." Someone should come up with a similar thing for HTML, because it truly is "interpreted," not read, by browsers. It's a necessary evil caused by the vast number of screen sizes, aspect ratios, and resolutions out there, but man, is it ever evil! I did a job once for major national retailer that had a lab with easily 50 mobile & desktop devices set up, and a team of people just checking to make sure everything on their e-commerce site worked on all of them, with various browsers. Wix and Squarespace never mention that kind of stuff in their ads about how "easy" it is to create your own site!!
Hey Too Much Layout
Hey That's My Lunch
How To Meet Ladies...

And PAL was Picture Always Lousy.
 
How NTSC came to be is an interesting story. My dad was a key man on the dev team for RCA, that faced two daunting problems emanating from the FCC. The start of the problem was that, when the FCC allocated bandwidth for VHF broadcasting on channels 2 thru 13, their allocation worked for the single video amplitude signal needed for B+W, but failed to allow enough bandwidth to carry the three amplitude signals that would obviously be needed for color. Forward thinking bunch!

Then, to compound their error, they awarded the broadcast standard to another company whose solution was to alternate two of the color signals and somehow sync a moving shadow mask in front of the CRT.

Management at RCA were blindsided, knew they didn't want to go into production on that cockamamie crap, so knew they had to take action. They responded by sequestering a team of their best guys in a lab, tasked with fixing it. Dad, who cut his eye teeth on Radar in the WWII Pacific theater, and the team figured out the first instance of multiplexing, where the third signal could be embedded in the other two.

Their idea was so clearly superior, the FCC relented (amazing in itself) and reassigned the std to RCA. Say what you will about NTSC, we really dodged a bullet on that one, and it did endure for 50 years. But yeah, hard to deal with all along.

What's still stunning to me about the work they did was that it was entirely done with vacuum tubes and slide rules, this being one of them.

20240515_091545.jpg
 
During Dad's time there was really no alternative. Arithmetic, including exponentials by pencil? Roots, trig and log functions by look-up table? No way! Anyway, you don't need most of the damn numbers those processes produce because, in engineering a three significant digit result will get you to the moon. I was the nerdy geek who used a slide rule from grade school all the way thru college and resisted the onset of digital calculators in the 70s, mostly because I watched guys making idiotic order of magnitude errors with them, and not even realizing it. Really - eleven digits of (useless) accuracy and you get it wrong by 100x? If you're doing it by slide rule, at least you are forced to carry the order of magnitude at front of mind, because the rule isn't gonna tell you any of that.

Now look: analog nothing. :p
 
How NTSC came to be is an interesting story. My dad was a key man on the dev team for RCA, that faced two daunting problems emanating from the FCC. The start of the problem was that, when the FCC allocated bandwidth for VHF broadcasting on channels 2 thru 13, their allocation worked for the single video amplitude signal needed for B+W, but failed to allow enough bandwidth to carry the three amplitude signals that would obviously be needed for color. Forward thinking bunch!

Then, to compound their error, they awarded the broadcast standard to another company whose solution was to alternate two of the color signals and somehow sync a moving shadow mask in front of the CRT.

Management at RCA were blindsided, knew they didn't want to go into production on that cockamamie crap, so knew they had to take action. They responded by sequestering a team of their best guys in a lab, tasked with fixing it. Dad, who cut his eye teeth on Radar in the WWII Pacific theater, and the team figured out the first instance of multiplexing, where the third signal could be embedded in the other two.

Their idea was so clearly superior, the FCC relented (amazing in itself) and reassigned the std to RCA. Say what you will about NTSC, we really dodged a bullet on that one, and it did endure for 50 years. But yeah, hard to deal with all along.

What's still stunning to me about the work they did was that it was entirely done with vacuum tubes and slide rules, this being one of them.

View attachment 79035
Never seen one before, but it looks cool! And I thought the foldout rulers were neat (replaced by a tape measurer).
 
A Raven partially along the veneering process, using Sapele, sometimes called Ribbon Mahogany. To me, this stuff looks expensive but it actually is not, it's priced well enough to be one of the choices of standard veneers.

20240518_122011.jpg

After 30 years of rough duty my lovely Devilbiss basecoat gun's fan valve finally gave up, so am trying this one. Guys are saying nice things about this gun for applying automotive topcoats, despite it's stupidly low price. Wood basecoat present a much, much lower bar, so we'll soon see. All the actions feel like a nice gun. Worst case it gets relegated to utility duty like painting screw heads, streamer cubbies and honey-do's.

20240518_115832.jpg
 
How NTSC came to be is an interesting story. My dad was a key man on the dev team for RCA, that faced two daunting problems emanating from the FCC. The start of the problem was that, when the FCC allocated bandwidth for VHF broadcasting on channels 2 thru 13, their allocation worked for the single video amplitude signal needed for B+W, but failed to allow enough bandwidth to carry the three amplitude signals that would obviously be needed for color. Forward thinking bunch!

Then, to compound their error, they awarded the broadcast standard to another company whose solution was to alternate two of the color signals and somehow sync a moving shadow mask in front of the CRT.

Management at RCA were blindsided, knew they didn't want to go into production on that cockamamie crap, so knew they had to take action. They responded by sequestering a team of their best guys in a lab, tasked with fixing it. Dad, who cut his eye teeth on Radar in the WWII Pacific theater, and the team figured out the first instance of multiplexing, where the third signal could be embedded in the other two.

Their idea was so clearly superior, the FCC relented (amazing in itself) and reassigned the std to RCA. Say what you will about NTSC, we really dodged a bullet on that one, and it did endure for 50 years. But yeah, hard to deal with all along.

What's still stunning to me about the work they did was that it was entirely done with vacuum tubes and slide rules, this being one of them.

View attachment 79035
I had no idea he was in that group! Yeah, sequential color field was insane. Of course —as I’m sure you know— the multiplex ended up giving us the crazy 29.97 frame rate to stay compatible with b&w sets. And the drop frame timecode sequence to stay in sync with real world times (which CBS steadfastly refused to use, sticking with non-drop that drifted 3 seconds and 10 frames per hour.)
 
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How NTSC came to be is an interesting story. My dad was a key man on the dev team for RCA, that faced two daunting problems emanating from the FCC. The start of the problem was that, when the FCC allocated bandwidth for VHF broadcasting on channels 2 thru 13, their allocation worked for the single video amplitude signal needed for B+W, but failed to allow enough bandwidth to carry the three amplitude signals that would obviously be needed for color. Forward thinking bunch!

Then, to compound their error, they awarded the broadcast standard to another company whose solution was to alternate two of the color signals and somehow sync a moving shadow mask in front of the CRT.

Management at RCA were blindsided, knew they didn't want to go into production on that cockamamie crap, so knew they had to take action. They responded by sequestering a team of their best guys in a lab, tasked with fixing it. Dad, who cut his eye teeth on Radar in the WWII Pacific theater, and the team figured out the first instance of multiplexing, where the third signal could be embedded in the other two.

Their idea was so clearly superior, the FCC relented (amazing in itself) and reassigned the std to RCA. Say what you will about NTSC, we really dodged a bullet on that one, and it did endure for 50 years. But yeah, hard to deal with all along.

What's still stunning to me about the work they did was that it was entirely done with vacuum tubes and slide rules, this being one of them.

View attachment 79035
 
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