My Philharmonic 3’s - Refining the refined...

@ICTWoody

Very, very nice work, Woody. Well done!
+1 here, for getting ferrous metals away from the speaker cables.
When I do similar projects, I keep a really strong magnet handy and I check every component for magnetic attraction.
I feel the same way about ferrous resistors in the signal path - particularly in the treble circuit on the crossover.
Once you remove ferrous components, there is a relaxed quality to the music that prevails.
Easy to hear, but hard to describe.

That said, are those ferrous screws that secure the speaker jumpers to those nice Cardas copper posts?
A non-ferrous alternative might be a quick win there...
 

ICTWoody

Junior Member
@ICTWoody

Very, very nice work, Woody. Well done!
+1 here, for getting ferrous metals away from the speaker cables.
When I do similar projects, I keep a really strong magnet handy and I check every component for magnetic attraction.
I feel the same way about ferrous resistors in the signal path - particularly in the treble circuit on the crossover.
Once you remove ferrous components, there is a relaxed quality to the music that prevails.
Easy to hear, but hard to describe.

That said, are those ferrous screws that secure the speaker jumpers to those nice Cardas copper posts?
A non-ferrous alternative might be a quick win there...

Hmmm. Might have a point. I could slap some stainless in there pretty easily. I’ll be at the hardware store a few more times for sure.

- Woody
 
You must have seen my suggestion of titanium screws. 🤣 is right, but hey, go big or go home, right? ;) I dont think they make the type he needs unfortunately. At least I could not find them in McMaster Carr...:)
 
@thin_ice

I'm with you. I've just never tried it myself, so remain curious about the impact of Titanium on the music signal.
Certainly enough exotic interconnects and tweeters would suggest that Titanium is a very good conductor of music...
BRING IT ON!
😂
 

ICTWoody

Junior Member
@ICTWoody
You're a man of action, Woody. Impressive!
Not sure if you will hear the difference - but it's one more thing you know is ticked-off.
Yup... that's my hope. I want to set these back up and not think "what if". I'm doing just about everything I can to improve these. I won't lose any sleep over something I didn't do.

And they were GREAT speakers before... I feel like they are going to be AMAZING speakers now.

- Woody
 
@ICTWoody
I know exactly what you mean. I walk the same path.
There's nothing worse than making all that effort - closing up the speaker and getting it all finished - and then remembering that you could have spent another $1.50 to tick another "what if?" box.
One thing I have found is that after some serious surgery - new crossovers components, binding posts, new wire, etc. - it always takes a bit of time for the speaker to come back on-song. So be prepared for this.
I proved this again recently, when I removed the sandcast (ferrous, magnetic, wirewound) resistors from the crossovers on our favorite speakers - and replaced them with MILLS (non-ferrous, non-magnetic, wirewound) version with a slightly higher power handling alternative. It definitely took around a week for the speakers to settle down again, before they moved back into that "relaxed" sound - and critical listening could begin.
It's like a "tension" in the music that slowly fades. I guess one day, someone a lot smarter than me will figure-out how to measure this stuff. In the meantime, there are many who don't believe it.
After completing so many different projects - and hearing this scenario again and again in both amps and speakers - I find I don't really need anyone else to endorse these findings. Life's like that.
I will be interested to read how it goes for you.
 
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ICTWoody

Junior Member
I guess one day, someone a lot smarter than me will figure-out how to measure this stuff. In the meantime, there are many who don't believe it. After completing so many different projects - and hearing this scenario again and again in both amps and speakers.
I 100% agree with this. I know lots of data guys wanna argue on this stuff, but I think there is SOMETHING or SOMETHINGS out there still that we don’t know to, or how to measure. Audiophiles always try and sum up this “something” with flowery words and phrases... like PRAT, inner detail, et. al.

I just call it magic.

- Woody
 
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