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Painting the porch...

fiddlefye

Senior Member
.... with my "tube-powered ghetto blaster". This thing has been around since a long-ago ex-father-in-law left it behind. It has provided desperately needed tunes through more projects than I can recall. Tubes still holding up, it sounds just fine for what it is. It even has an input for a turntable, though what sort of cart is required I can only guess. Oldest Onkyp I have and the oldest I recall having seen.
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3/4 of the way through the project and will finish tomorrow. I've been waiting for a few days in a row that were clear, not too hot and hot too cold. The 110 year old porch was in desperate need.
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I don't know if this is a stupid question or not. Do you think that is the original wood? I wonder what Edward Woodward Would think? (thick British accent). :)

Would have never thought Onkyo made a tube boombox. Super cool, I love Onkyo!
 
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Try1256

Very Special Member
I just stripped and painted our front door on Labor Day weekend. Had at least 6 coats of paint. Took me all weekend but the results are worth it. Now for the side door. Aghhhh.......
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
I don't know if this is a stupid question or not. Do you think that is the original wood? I wonder what Edward Woodward Would think? (thick British accent). :)

Would have never thought Onkyo made a tube boombox. Super cool, I love Onkyo!
Yes, it is definitely the original 110-year-old wood, originally painted in a grey lead-based oil paint that refuses to be removed where it still adheres. I've tried every sort of mechanical method to remove it including a belt sander and the stuff is so hard that all the worked was a chisel and mallet. I finally gave up (life and time are not infinite) and removed what I could with a scraper and painted over the rest. Not my original plan, but at least the job got done.

From the reverse angle and front steps.
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fiddlefye

Senior Member
I just stripped and painted our front door on Labor Day weekend. Had at least 6 coats of paint. Took me all weekend but the results are worth it. Now for the side door. Aghhhh.......
Our front door still has the original 110-year-old varnish. A project for next year will be to sand it down some and put on an overcoat or two. Should be good for another hundred years.
 

Audionut

Next Round Is On Me
Yes, it is definitely the original 110-year-old wood, originally painted in a grey lead-based oil paint that refuses to be removed where it still adheres. I've tried every sort of mechanical method to remove it including a belt sander and the stuff is so hard that all the worked was a chisel and mallet. I finally gave up (life and time are not infinite) and removed what I could with a scraper and painted over the rest. Not my original plan, but at least the job got done.

From the reverse angle and front steps.
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Paint stripper is the easiest way and they have some eco friendly options now that won’t make you pass out or burn a hole through your skin. A large walk behind sander would come in second...
Greatcolor scheme and amazing brickwork!
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Paint stripper is the easiest way and they have some eco friendly options now that won’t make you pass out or burn a hole through your skin. A large walk behind sander would come in second...
Greatcolor scheme and amazing brickwork!
First try will be diacetone alcohol, actually. Depending on what they used on the door I might be able to simply soften and flatten the original varnish if it is alcohol based. I could strip it, but if I can retain the original finish and just freshen up the surface I'd prefer it.
 

Audionut

Next Round Is On Me
First try will be diacetone alcohol, actually. Depending on what they used on the door I might be able to simply soften and flatten the original varnish if it is alcohol based. I could strip it, but if I can retain the original finish and just freshen up the surface I'd prefer it.
Oh I intended the walk behind sander comment for the deck. Mechanical Sanders are great for sanding wood but paint and other finishes usually gum up the sand paper quickly.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Oh I intended the walk behind sander comment for the deck. Mechanical Sanders are great for sanding wood but paint and other finishes usually gum up the sand paper quickly.
The 100 year old lead based paint that remained was not coming off with anything sort of a chemical stripper. I just pulled up anything even vaguely loose and in the end, painted over it. Not the original plan, but the realistic one.
 

Audionut

Next Round Is On Me
The 100 year old lead based paint that remained was not coming off with anything sort of a chemical stripper. I just pulled up anything even vaguely loose and in the end, painted over it. Not the original plan, but the realistic one.
Oh wow, given that age I’m sure it’s baked on and become part of the wood.
 
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