Show me your lamps!

StevenZ

Pending Gold Star Member
So, every once in a while I check @Fleawatt 's website to see if he's got cool stuff for sale. I was surprised when I went on to his site last week and saw this awesome vintage tobacco tin turned into a lamp, complete with vintage looking cord and dimmer. I've been out of the office most of the last 2 weeks so when I finally came in this morning it was nice to find the box here which I had forgotten completely about. Below is a photo from Derek's blog (Derek if you want me to remove it, please let me know) as it best captures the beauty of this little guy and then a few photos of my own which aren't very good. I'll try to take a night time photo with it eventually.


So yeah, show me your cool lamps. I'd love to see them!


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MikeO

Active Member
I really like his site as well. I do have one of his earlier chip amps and had him build a passive preamp for me when I was running active speakers. A really talented guy.
 

Wntrmute2

Not So Mediocre Member
Vintage lamps
 

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Fran604g

Just Call Me Junior
I completely restored this a couple of years ago. It had been in my wife's family (maternal grandparents) since it was new.
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Here's one my wife's grandfather made out of brass sheet and "slag" glass probably in the late 30's. We added the beaded fringe to replace the original brown glass bead fringe that had all but disappeared by the time it came to us in 1986 upon the death of her grandmother. It illuminates my c.1902 Zon-O-Phone "Parlor" and c.1902 Victor "Pre-Dog" Type E.
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My paternal great grandfather was the last blacksmith in Batavia, NY and keeping with more contemporary tastes in the 30s and 40s, he was quite active in ornamental smithing. He hand forged a pair of these floor lamps, one of which has sadly been lost to the family. Fortunately my cousin was able to acquire this one and very graciously gifted it to me for preservation along with a few other invaluable Pratt family heirlooms that I had inherited from my father. I restored it to it's former glory. Incidentally, he was commissioned by the City of Buffalo to hand forge several pieces of hardware for the construction of the Buffalo City Hall building to include hinges and door handles - among other more-or-less ornamental pieces. An Elm leaf (located at the base of the partial loop) was his signature "logo".
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Another lamp that came to us from my wife's maternal grandmother, which only required rewiring 30+ years ago. Unfortunately the shade didn't survive our very young children, and this was at the time the best alternative we could afford. I really need to find a more accurate period correct shade at some point. The glass is actually a pinkish-orange color unlike the greenish hue in my poor photo. Don't pay attention to our "barn" floor, which needs to be repainted again.
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A chandelier original to our home, once located in the very small "dining room" that I finally restored a couple of years ago, retaining the original porcelain socket switches still in perfect condition, after being in storage for about 35 years - since the beginning of my deconstruction and subsequent renovation of the house. It hangs in my "audio room" and is powered using the "knob and tube" style (fed from a junction box in another room with appropriate modern wire).
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EDIT: A few more I forgot to include in my original post a few minutes ago. 🙄

An early 20th century "convertible" table/wall lamp I acquired a couple of years ago. Shown here illuminating my c.1904 Victor "tapering tonearm" Type E and c.1913 Victrola XVI with one of our Aladdin kerosene lamps.
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A non-descript table lamp probably from the 1930s-40s.
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And, finally, an iconic mid-century swag lamp that was my wife's mother's.
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Last edited:

StevenZ

Pending Gold Star Member
I completely restored this a couple of years ago. It had been in my wife's family (maternal grandparents) since it was new.
View attachment 38069

Here's one my wife's grandfather made out of brass sheet and "slag" glass probably in the late 30's. We added the beaded fringe to replace the original brown glass bead fringe that had all but disappeared by the time it came to us in 1986 upon the death of her grandmother. It illuminates my c.1902 Zon-O-Phone "Parlor" and c.1902 Victor "Pre-Dog" Type E.
View attachment 38073

View attachment 38070

My paternal great grandfather was the last blacksmith in Batavia, NY and keeping with more contemporary tastes in the 30s and 40s, he was quite active in ornamental smithing. He hand forged a pair of these floor lamps, one of which has sadly been lost to the family. Fortunately my cousin was able to acquire this one and very graciously gifted it to me for preservation along with a few other invaluable Pratt family heirlooms that I had inherited from my father. I restored it to it's former glory. Incidentally, he was commissioned by the City of Buffalo to hand forge several pieces of hardware for the construction of the Buffalo City Hall building to include hinges and door handles - among other more-or-less ornamental pieces. An Elm leaf (located at the base of the partial loop) was his signature "logo".
View attachment 38072

View attachment 38074

View attachment 38077

Another lamp that came to us from my wife's maternal grandmother, which only required rewiring 30+ years ago. Unfortunately the shade didn't survive our very young children, and this was at the time the best alternative we could afford. I really need to find a more accurate period correct shade at some point. The glass is actually a pinkish-orange color unlike the greenish hue in my poor photo. Don't pay attention to our "barn" floor, which needs to be repainted again.
View attachment 38076

A chandelier original to our home, once located in the very small "dining room" that I finally restored a couple of years ago, retaining the original porcelain socket switches still in perfect condition, after being in storage for about 35 years - since the beginning of my deconstruction and subsequent renovation of the house. It hangs in my "audio room" and is powered using the "knob and tube" style (fed from a junction box in another room with appropriate modern wire).
View attachment 38078

View attachment 38079

View attachment 38080

EDIT: A few more I forgot to include in my original post a few minutes ago. 🙄

An early 20th century "convertible" table/wall lamp I acquired a couple of years ago. Shown here illuminating my c.1904 Victor "tapering tonearm" Type E and c.1913 Victrola XVI with one of our Aladdin kerosene lamps.
View attachment 38081

A non-descript table lamp probably from the 1930s-40s.
View attachment 38083

And, finally, an iconic mid-century swag lamp that was my wife's mother's.
View attachment 38082
Thank you for sharing. These are beautiful pieces and I enjoyed reading the history behind them.
 

StevenZ

Pending Gold Star Member
When you wake up from a fever dream with the phrase 'bread lamp' stuck in your head... you go out and make a bread lamp.

The light was lovely. (Used a spray sealant, it kept for a few months before crumbling.)

View attachment 38094
That's really neat. I hadn't thought about anything of the such, but using organic materials like this is a cool idea.
 
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