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JoeThePop

Known member
I don't get up there like I used to (haven't had time), but I'd always park on E. 2nd St. at the Clinton River Trail trailhead and take the Paint Creek Trail by bicycle. One of my favorites for scenery in the area, and it's just under ten miles to Lake Orion via the trail.
I’ve done that bike ride to Lake Orion and back many times. And I’ve been known to stop at Rochester Mills after the ride to treat myself to a well deserved beer and a bowl of their delicious beer cheese soup. Been a couple of years though. I will have to make sure to make it a few times this year. Like you said, beautiful scenery along the way.
 

JoeThePop

Known member
The bike ride is nice, but the drive kills it for me--round trip, it's at least an hour and a half of driving which, on busy days, is a big chunk of time out of the day. On less busy days it's not a problem, especially when I can get there on a weekday between rush hours. My closest rail trail is the Macomb Orchard Trail, and even there the closest trailhead (Richmond) is 35 minutes from the house. The Freedom Trail is closer, but I'm not as fond of riding along Metro Pkwy.

yeah it is close to an hour round trip for me. I have also rode the Macomb Orchard trail from Romeo to Armada and back. Nice scenery also. Macomb Orchard trail also hooks up with the Clinton River trail and then it’s a short hop to the Paint Creek trail. Really a great use of the old railroad lines. I have told my wife I want easy access to parks and the trail system when we move ams it’s working out with where she would like to move in the northern Washington Twp area.
 

Shelby1420

Super Moderator
Staff member
No wonder we go through the deed so quickly......
 

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JoeThePop

Known member
This is a grove of pine trees in Rochester Municipal Park in Rochester, Michigan. The park was started in 1935 with a purchase of 14 acres with federal funding as part of the New Deal during the depression. The following year a local Boy Scout troup planted 12 saplings to honor the 12 young men from the area who had earned the rank of Eagle Scout beginning in 1927. The tags on the trees were added by a local historical society in 2007.

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