That itch.

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Man do I understand that "Itch" you're talking about, and I have it bad too!! I was very happy with my system as it was and could have or should have been completely satisfied with it but apparently I wasn't. So to satisfy "my itch", I just purchased some of that Iancanada stuff. ConditionerPi, TransportPi, FiFoPi, and a StationPi to conveniently mount everything. Does it make my system sound that much better? Not really atm but I'm told that it will take a week or 2 for it to make a difference. However, it all looks pretty cool, and I will be making a nice case for it all too, so hopefully that should take care of that Itch for awhile, until it comes back again that is Uggg But does it really ever end?
I'm assuming that's all Raspberry Pi tweaks? I can't relate to that specifically but I get like that with my turntables. Like, well, I don't want to switch my turntable out anymore but.....what if I got a super fancy headshell for it? What if I got a better looking record weight? What if I changed out the headshell wires? Problem is, I've now done all that stuff so I'm left to look at the furniture it sits on.
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
My 2nd shot at scratching the itch with new powered desktop monitors for the office looks like a keeper.

Not only do the Jamo S 801 PM sound better than the Mackie CR3-X I had to return, but they look better too and are ergonomically a more practical fit with a USB input and IR remote. I didn't realize these actually come with fairly attractive speaker grilles that attach magnetically, pretty rare with desktop type speakers. For some reason they make you dig pretty hard to find any product picture with the grilles on, I bought these from Crutchfield, who have no such photo on their product description page at all:

S 801 PM.jpg

I can do away with an external desktop DAC because the speakers already have one built-in, and these do not have the high noise floor hiss level that the Mackie CR3-X did, they are dead quiet at idle. The IR remote is handy in that it controls not only volume/mute, but when connected via USB the IR remote commands for stop/play and advance track are communicated back to my laptop where the Qobuz desktop app for Windows recognizes and obeys them.

No special Windows driver is needed as the USB input is UAC1 which tops out at 24/96, however 24/192 tracks still play, they're just down sampled (every other sample is discarded). There is also a Toslink input but I don't have any such source available in the office.

While I had my external desktop DAC with me and fully expected to use it with the speaker's analog RCA input, I was surprised to see they don't even include that cable in the package, but they do include a Type A to Type B USB cable, kind of a hint that's how they expect the S 801 PM to be used. So while I may at some point try the analog input just for kicks, I think the USB input and it's aforementioned communication with the Qobuz desktop app via the IR remote over USB are more practical for office use.

I can stomach the +$50 price tag as compared to the Mackie CR3-X, as the silent noise floor, IR remote, USB and Toslink digital inputs, and overall better looks seem to be a better fit for my office setup. Even the faux walnut trim on these speakers matches the painted faux walnut color of my desk. Keepers.
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
My 2nd shot at scratching the itch with new powered desktop monitors for the office looks like a keeper.

Not only do the Jamo S 801 PM sound better than the Mackie CR3-X I had to return, but they look better too and are ergonomically a more practical fit with a USB input and IR remote. I didn't realize they actually come with fairly attractive speaker grilles that attach magnetically, pretty rare with desktop type speakers. For some reason they make you dig pretty hard to find any product picture with the grilles on, I bought these from Crutchfield, who have no such photo on their product description page at all:

View attachment 37726

I can do away with an external desktop DAC because the speakers already have one built-in, and these do not have the high noise floor hiss level that the Mackie CR3-X did, they are dead quiet at idle. The IR remote is handy in that it controls not only volume/mute, but when connected via USB the IR remote commands for stop/play and advance track are communicated back to my laptop and the Qobuz desktop app for Windows recognizes and obeys them.

No special Windows driver is needed as the USB input is UAC1 which tops out at 24/96, however 24/192 tracks still play, they're just down sampled (every other sample is discarded). There is also a Toslink input but I don't have any such source available in the office.

While I had my external desktop DAC with me and fully expected to use it with the speaker's analog RCA input, I was surprised to see they don't even include that cable in the package, but they do include a Type A to Type B USB cable, kind of a hint that's how they expect the S 801 PM to be used. So while I may at some point try the analog input just for kicks, I think the USB input and it's aforementioned communication with the Qobuz desktop app via the IR remote over USB are more practical for office use.

I can stomach the +$50 price tag as compared to the Mackie CR3-X, as the silent noise floor, IR remote, USB and Toslink digital inputs, and overall better looks seem to be a better fit for my office setup. Even the faux walnut trim on these speakers matches the painted faux walnut color of my desk. Keepers.
That sounds like about the best improvement for $50 you're likely to get anywhere in this hobby.

I'm really impressed with how desktop monitors have adapted to the market. Good friend of mine just bought a pair of powered PSBs that you can plug a turntable directly into...they have a built in phono preamp!
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
That sounds like about the best improvement for $50 you're likely to get anywhere in this hobby.

I'm really impressed with how desktop monitors have adapted to the market. Good friend of mine just bought a pair of powered PSBs that you can plug a turntable directly into...they have a built in phono preamp!
I see that the comparable Klipsch models have a phono input, probably all made in the same factory, as Jamo is a Klipsch owned brand.

I've also decided I can de-clutter my desk one stop further and bring home my external HDD with my JRiver library on it. I only have so much opportunity to listen to music at work and for that Qobuz will certainly suffice, so I'll disconnect the local library (and with it DSD) at work and just roll with PCM via Qobuz directly into these speaker's USB input.

I almost forgot... these S 801 PM have a loudness button on the IR remote, to restore low frequency response at the lower listening levels I will typically use in an office setting. Thats old school receiver-ish, I haven't had any gear with a loudness button since the late 80s.
 
Well, not an itch, but a mild tickle…

The plinth-less JVC TT-71 I have here (as well as a spare, and a few UA-5045 arms) has a base now.

A Victor JVC factory plinth, the single arm board version CLP1 (I believe that’s the name of it) popped up at a great price. It’s one of their Japan-only issued 7-layer/constrained layer plinths in rosewood veneer. These accept the stand alone drive units- the TT-71, TT-81, and TT-101 and the uncommon TT-61 as well, and the Victor/JVC UA-series arms, which are between a 9 1/2” and 10” arm. You’d need to step up to the 2 arm board model to fit the 12” UA series arms, but those plinths are heavier, and deeper- thus requiring a large enough stand to place it- it’s a big, broad unit. Also, the dust cover isn’t mounted on these larger units- it’s a big square thing, that you lift off. So, the 1 arm board unit in a traditional size and with hinged cover is better suited for my personal needs.

Nicely finished in rosewood, there’s a touch of sun fade I’ll see if I can restore- any tips appreciated.


I don’t know if this held the big top dog TT-101 drive unit, or the second from top TT-81, but the TT-71 is the same circumference and goes in correctly. Arm board looks like it held the Victor/JVC UA-7045 arm, essentially the same as the UA-5045 for argument sake but with a VTA on the fly setup, leaving a slightly larger mounting hole in the board.

I can mount the JVC/Victor UA-5045 or maybe the Technics EPA-100 without fuss- but eventually would like to add the UA-7045 down the road.

Now, a TT-81 drive unit would be nice, but I’m not… uncontrollably itching… to do that- the TT-71, while not as advanced, is no lame dog.

I am enjoying window shopping more than anything right now. The sound of my setups are very satisfying, most things are serviceable and I have spare parts. It’s more a refinement or maintenance of what I currently own- get a few carts rebuilt, decide what to let go of the remaining stacks of gear, fill out a few gaps in the record collection…

Anyhow, just wrapped up cleaning about 800+ (maybe 1000?) records and re-sleeved them in fresh sleeves, with still 400+ to go, and appreciating what I have.

Unsure when I’ll mount up the Victor/JVC plinth and really in no rush, to be honest- but it will be fun to do so eventually.
 

MWalt

Active Member
Well, not an itch, but a mild tickle…

The plinth-less JVC TT-71 I have here (as well as a spare, and a few UA-5045 arms) has a base now.

A Victor JVC factory plinth, the single arm board version CLP1 (I believe that’s the name of it) popped up at a great price. It’s one of their Japan-only issued 7-layer/constrained layer plinths in rosewood veneer. These accept the stand alone drive units- the TT-71, TT-81, and TT-101 and the uncommon TT-61 as well, and the Victor/JVC UA-series arms, which are between a 9 1/2” and 10” arm. You’d need to step up to the 2 arm board model to fit the 12” UA series arms, but those plinths are heavier, and deeper- thus requiring a large enough stand to place it- it’s a big, broad unit. Also, the dust cover isn’t mounted on these larger units- it’s a big square thing, that you lift off. So, the 1 arm board unit in a traditional size and with hinged cover is better suited for my personal needs.

Nicely finished in rosewood, there’s a touch of sun fade I’ll see if I can restore- any tips appreciated.


I don’t know if this held the big top dog TT-101 drive unit, or the second from top TT-81, but the TT-71 is the same circumference and goes in correctly. Arm board looks like it held the Victor/JVC UA-7045 arm, essentially the same as the UA-5045 for argument sake but with a VTA on the fly setup, leaving a slightly larger mounting hole in the board.

I can mount the JVC/Victor UA-5045 or maybe the Technics EPA-100 without fuss- but eventually would like to add the UA-7045 down the road.

Now, a TT-81 drive unit would be nice, but I’m not… uncontrollably itching… to do that- the TT-71, while not as advanced, is no lame dog.

I am enjoying window shopping more than anything right now. The sound of my setups are very satisfying, most things are serviceable and I have spare parts. It’s more a refinement or maintenance of what I currently own- get a few carts rebuilt, decide what to let go of the remaining stacks of gear, fill out a few gaps in the record collection…

Anyhow, just wrapped up cleaning about 800+ (maybe 1000?) records and re-sleeved them in fresh sleeves, with still 400+ to go, and appreciating what I have.

Unsure when I’ll mount up the Victor/JVC plinth and really in no rush, to be honest- but it will be fun to do so eventually.
I would love to find one of those to upgrade my QL-7. They all seem to be in Japan for crazy prices and shipping.
 
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