The Covid-19 thread.

kirk57

Junior Member
2nd dose here feels like a bad hangover.
Huh. I got no reaction at all. Really unpredictable.

Also, I know somebody who has CLL (a form of luekemia). They had the J&J shot, did not have a great reaction to it but recovered. Tested for antibodies 6 weeks later. Nothing. Nada. Complete waste of the vaccine.

I don't what they are going to do now, stay in the house forever? Not a good situation.
 
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JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Huh. I got no reaction at all. Really unpredictable.

Also, I know somebody who has CLL (a form of luekemia). They had the J&J shot and were tested for antibodies 6 weeks later. Nothing. Nada.
Complete waste of the vaccine. I don't what they are going to do now, stay in the house forever? Not a good situation.
I've been told that my age group is in nice window of being young enough to have a quick-reaction immunity response, and old enough to be knocked down by the same reaction. Older, and my body would kind of space out the reaction, younger and my body would be like, "whatever man".
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
That’s exactly it, your immune system is primed to take a swing at it.

I had it early on but by 9 months later I had no readily traceable antibodies, and was told by my doctor that he’d seen reinfections in people within six months of them having had a relatively mild case, and that the second instance had been worse, at least from how they felt, maybe because the body was more primed to attack it. Much of what we feel as being sick is the affects of our own immune system working. When I had it, the actual Covid part before my body figured it out, was fatigue, insane chills like I’ve never had, had a horrible dry couch and everything tasted metallic. Five days in this turned to the more expected cold/flu feeling. Sneezing, runny nose, etc. The first part felt super weird, like nothing I’d had before. The last part was my body kicking it out I guess because a week and one day after first symptoms I felt fine. The cold part lasted 3 days. My work partner who got it never got the cold/flu part but his wife did, and it was her antibody test that let us figure out our common mystery illness.
I remember when you were going through that and it sounded truly miserable. It ties in precisely with the experience of a few other people I know who had covid.

Having lived with my immune system for six and a half decades now I'm pretty tuned into its workings. When I've been exposed to something that gets it triggered I always get a period of strange euphoria - best description; I just have a sense of incredible well-being for a time - followed by whatever got it excited just disappearing. The reaction to the vaccine was the first time in living memory that I experienced anything beyond that. Katrina's reaction was exactly identical to mine, though I think my chills were a bit more severe perhaps? Hard to tell. Let's just say we both had an uncomfortable night...
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
I remember when you were going through that and it sounded truly miserable. It ties in precisely with the experience of a few other people I know who had covid.

Having lived with my immune system for six and a half decades now I'm pretty tuned into its workings. When I've been exposed to something that gets it triggered I always get a period of strange euphoria - best description; I just have a sense of incredible well-being for a time - followed by whatever got it excited just disappearing. The reaction to the vaccine was the first time in living memory that I experienced anything beyond that. Katrina's reaction was exactly identical to mine, though I think my chills were a bit more severe perhaps? Hard to tell. Let's just say we both had an uncomfortable night...
Funny as I get that weird euphoria, too, but then whatever sickness it is hits like a truck later i the day. The irony of this last year for me is that I have a shit immune system and always get sick, but from February 2020 until now I haven't been sick once, the longest stretch I can remember. I know we're all living different lives, but I haven't been anything like a hermit. If anything my wife and I have been a bit too la-dee-da about the whole thing, despite obeying the basic rules.

I see friends venturing out to eat for the first time since last march and I'm kinda selfishly bummed because for a year my wife and I had the whole city to ourselves. We found out pretty early on which places were big, had good ventilation, and were open, and so we've just been kind of living our lives, just masked up by ourselves in empty restaurants and stores and driving fast on empty streets. Like some weird Springsteen song but substitute Covid for empty rusting steel mill towns.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Funny as I get that weird euphoria, too, but then whatever sickness it is hits like a truck later i the day. The irony of this last year for me is that I have a shit immune system and always get sick, but from February 2020 until now I haven't been sick once, the longest stretch I can remember. I know we're all living different lives, but I haven't been anything like a hermit. If anything my wife and I have been a bit too la-dee-da about the whole thing, despite obeying the basic rules.

I see friends venturing out to eat for the first time since last march and I'm kinda selfishly bummed because for a year my wife and I had the whole city to ourselves. We found out pretty early on which places were big, had good ventilation, and were open, and so we've just been kind of living our lives, just masked up by ourselves in empty restaurants and stores and driving fast on empty streets. Like some weird Springsteen song but substitute Covid for empty rusting steel mill towns.
You're the first person I've met who didn't respond to my "euphoria" statement like I have a third eye in my head. In reality I suspect many people experience it, just aren't sufficiently aware to notice it. I tell you, if I felt that way all the time the world would either be changed or destroyed in short order! For some unknown reason I've always had a more robust immune system than pretty much anyone I've known (knoch wood and all that). I made it through my entire school career (K through uni) without a sick day and remember sometimes spending a week or more alone in class with just my teacher for company. I thank whichever of my ancestors bequeathed my immune system, guessing it was my maternal grandmother who was never ill that I was aware of and who lived to 98. She was one of the kids that survived the 1918 thing without ever getting ill in spite of having stood in the kitchen with her mother when she breathed her last. That reaction to the vaccine was a real shock though, let me tell you.

Restaurants, bars and theatres are just plain closed here still and I really have no idea when they'll start to open again. Our last meal in a restaurant was Valentine's Day 2020. I keep hoping I'll be able to work again, someday... funny thing with the "empty streets" - here every time there is a lockdown the traffic will drop for a day or two and then the streets are sudden;y busy all over again, just like nothing happened. Not sure where they're going, mind you!
 
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JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
You're the first person I've met who didn't respond to my "euphoria" statement like I have a third eye in my head. In reality I suspect many people experience it, just aren't sufficiently aware to notice it. I tell you, if I felt that way all the time the world would either be changed or destroyed in short order! For some unknown reason I've always had a more robust immune system than pretty much anyone I've known (knoch wood and all that). I made it through my entire school career (K through uni) without a sick day and remember sometimes spending a week or more alone in class with just my teacher for company. I thank whichever of my ancestors bequeathed my immune system, guessing it was my maternal grandmother who was never ill that I was aware of and who lived to 98. She was one of the kids that survived the 1918 thing without ever getting ill in spite of having stood in the kitchen with her mother when she breathed her last. That reaction to the vaccine was a real shock though, let me tell you.

Restaurants, bars and theatres are just plain closed here still and I really have no idea when they'll start to open again. Our last meal in a restaurant was Valentine's Day 2020. I keep hoping I'll be able to work again, someday...
Somebody in my online circles described their 2nd vaccine dose as a weird euphoria, horrible hangover, then more euphoria. So there must be three of us. I didn't get Euphoria this time, but last night I felt fine. Took about 12 hours to hit me.

The restaurants here have been hit miss as far as being open, and what type of place they are. I had a birthday dinner in mid January at some big restaurant that felt like I was in a big glass house filled with plants - one of the only places open then that wasn't igloos or outdoor huts that looked an awful lot like indoor seating. But last summer a lot of places were open, and in Colombia everything was open but with spaced out seating. We ate like kings there... not crowded and a very good exchange rate.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Somebody in my online circles described their 2nd vaccine dose as a weird euphoria, horrible hangover, then more euphoria. So there must be three of us. I didn't get Euphoria this time, but last night I felt fine. Took about 12 hours to hit me.

The restaurants here have been hit miss as far as being open, and what type of place they are. I had a birthday dinner in mid January at some big restaurant that felt like I was in a big glass house filled with plants - one of the only places open then that wasn't igloos or outdoor huts that looked an awful lot like indoor seating. But last summer a lot of places were open, and in Colombia everything was open but with spaced out seating. We ate like kings there... not crowded and a very good exchange rate.
I'm thinking Wineology has a good idea with the roof-top seating with what look to me to be panels to separate between seating. Knowing the guy who owns it he was probably smart enough to tap into some grant funding to pay for it. Many years ago there used to be a great old neighbourhood pub downtown close to the river that had a roof terrace and it was always a favourite spot to drink - didn't hurt that I lived but a two block stumble away. All in a neighbourhood flattened to build the casino, of course. Still, there is something appealing about being up on the roof._DSC2400.jpg
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Last summer there were a few rooftop concerts just around the corner from me. I never had any idea they were happening until music just started drifting past. I'm hoping if things don't start to reopen this sort of thing will happen.
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JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Last summer there were a few rooftop concerts just around the corner from me. I never had any idea they were happening until music just started drifting past. I'm hoping if things don't start to reopen this sort of thing will happen.
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You'd have gotten a kick out of Randolph Street in Chicago over the winter, where a lot of the fancy restaurants are. The way the street is, there's side streets off the main one. So they filled those will all sorts of random ways to keep people both somewhat warm, outside, and isolated. So there was this collection of igloos and tents and wood cabins and plastic domes all up and down the street, anything to keep people coming in as there was no indoor seating allowed. I ate in a cabin on a rooftop at one place, which was kind of fun, just our group of 3. As much as I've hated the pandemic, I'll have lasting memories of the times my wife and our two friends in our bubble went out and lived amongst all the strange ways places and people were getting by.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
You'd have gotten a kick out of Randolph Street in Chicago over the winter, where a lot of the fancy restaurants are. The way the street is, there's side streets off the main one. So they filled those will all sorts of random ways to keep people both somewhat warm, outside, and isolated. So there was this collection of igloos and tents and wood cabins and plastic domes all up and down the street, anything to keep people coming in as there was no indoor seating allowed. I ate in a cabin on a rooftop at one place, which was kind of fun, just our group of 3. As much as I've hated the pandemic, I'll have lasting memories of the times my wife and our two friends in our bubble went out and lived amongst all the strange ways places and people were getting by.
There were some interesting things going on here, especially downtown where for a few weeks they just closed the main street and restaurants and bars just moved tons of tables into the street. We never did partake, though thought about it once or twice...
 

Wntrmute2

Not So Mediocre Member
My youngest bro got his 1st shot a week and a half ago, regardless of the fact he had Covid-19 a while back. He got sick as hell and thought he was having a heart attack. The worst headache he's ever experienced (and he used to drink pretty heavily before completely abstaining 30 years ago), fortunately the side effects only lasted 3 days. I just don't get it. Why vaccinate people who've actually had the virus? I mean, I've read the propaganda on both sides for and against, and personally I'm a big fan of vaccinations because they generally serve the greater good, but shouldn't our governing bodies be concentrating on those who haven't had the disease? 🤔🤷‍♂️
I BELIEVE that the research shows a longer and better immunity from the vaccine compared to the actual disease. I don't understand the why's but what's the harm? Maybe a second exposure as in the booster helps the immune system.
 
BTW, I read something ridiculous in my news feed two days ago--a private school said they would fire any teacher who got a COVID vaccination. Apparently the policy of an armchair infectious disease expert.
Honestly? That school should be shut down immediately!
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
The vaccine shouldn't be hard to understand. It takes the 'novel' out of "novel coronavirus".

So instead of a complete stranger coming into your body's house with the surprise of a Navy SEAL, your body knows what's up and has weapons at the ready, tailored specifically to the skills of the intruder. Doesn't mean the intruder won't get through the door but it'll leave in a body bag instead of you.
 

Andyman

Junior Member

JoeThePop

Known member
"In the letter, the school claims tens of thousands of women worldwide had adverse reproductive issues by just being near someone who was vaccinated, including irregular menstruation, bleeding and miscarriages."

Wow. There are no words for this level of ignorance (not that I will share on this site anyway).
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Half the people are below 100 IQ .... that's a lot of people, and figure the number of folks that leaves around 80 IQ and of course there's going to be some dumb ideas bandied about. You used to have to earn a voice that could influence people, now you just need a Facebook account.
 

Wntrmute2

Not So Mediocre Member
My head is hurting from trying to wrap around that school issue. How in the world can they fire you for taking a "medication"? Could they fire you for taking insulin, a rabies vaccine, birth control, a pneumonia vaccine? This really takes the cake! Talk about an invasion of privacy.
 
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