The Great Tidal to Tape Experiment

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
They sure looked idiosyncratic all right, but very cool. I've actually been pondering picking up a second deck at some point as I the Teac C3-RX seems to have taken up permanent residence in the living room system and my main system lacks one entirely now. I did have a second machine years ago, but it died in some manner that simply could not be repaired. Would a 1000 be worth picking up or is it too ancient?

It certainly is worth picking up. I'd snag one on an instant. It's about as close to open reel sound as a tape deck ever produced.
However, be prepared to send it to a very knowledgeable Nak tech, and not the local electronic resources guy. There are a handful of them in North America, all in the US of A. When I say a handful, I mean 3 or 4.
Also be prepared for liberal applications of cash to get it working right. They are not cheap to service!
Once all of that is done, you will have one heck of a tape deck. I've always wanted a 700 or 1000. Incredible machines.

Out of curiosity, what is he asking?
 

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
Oh course it has to be the limited. That is THE one. The ultimate cassette deck.

And yes, they just kept getting better until they were discontinued.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Yeah, they are -- I think that a good analogy is trophy wife. High value, but high overhead. May net out to be worth the investment in the long run. :)
I will go have another look when I wander by next. The guy tends to rather high prices, but we get on well and he knows the cassette machines aren't likely to move as quickly as something like the Marantz receivers he seems to go through pretty quickly. There was a gorgeous 2250 in wood case in stock when I was in. No temptation on my part, though!
 

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
I will go have another look when I wander by next. The guy tends to rather high prices, but we get on well and he knows the cassette machines aren't likely to move as quickly as something like the Marantz receivers he seems to go through pretty quickly. There was a gorgeous 2250 in wood case in stock when I was in. No temptation on my part, though!

Well, snag the 1000 for me if the price is good . :)
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Well, snag the 1000 for me if the price is good . :)
I'll have a look. I didn't see a price tag on it at the time, but then most of the huge amount of gear in the place doesn't seem to have one. I could definitely use a second deck myself as well at some point as pulling the one downstairs would spoil the balance of the layout.... ok, that's shallow, but it a "public" space.
 

Prime Minister

Site Owner
Staff member
This is working so well for me, that my cassette deck has just become another source. Go figure. I don't even think about it much. I just listen to music.
 
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BruceK

Junior Member
One modest testimonial I can offer is that my Maxell UD tapes — which I began buying in 1972 — are all still operating just fine. Almost all of them are 90s. I still have my first deck (a TEAC A-360S) which is limited sonically, but looks the business with its wooden cheeks and flashing run light. And I have a Nakamichi 202. In and amongst the Maxells (which are probably 90% of my holdings) I have other brands of tapes from Advent to BASF to Sony and on and on, but luckily the Maxells have held up superbly.

My main complaint now is that until last year ago I was always able to drive a car that still had a cassette deck. The latest was a 2003 Saab 9-5 wagon . . . amazing that it was fitted with cassette player that late, no? I loved taking cassettes with me on road trips. Back in the 80s a bookbinder friend helped me to make a wonderful clamshell box, covered in book cloth, that holds a dozen tapes. But sadly last May that car got a seized main bearing and was too expensive to repair, so now I have only CD and USB. (And it's a Honda, after my driving nothing but Saabs for twenty-five years.)
 
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