The intriguing, compelling and beguiling vocabulary thread

New word learned tonight while reading about collecting Porsche 356s…

pe·nu·ri·ous
/pəˈn(y)o͝orēəs/

adjective
FORMAL

1. extremely poor; poverty-stricken.
"a penurious old tramp"

2. parsimonious; mean.
"a tight-fisted, penurious boss whose wage scale is well below other bandleaders"
 

kirk57

Junior Member
I read news sources from the UK (not the Sun :)) and they regularly throw out words that have me reaching for me dictionary.
Just this week I saw a reference to Shakespeare, as if all the readers understood why the reference was relevant.
 
I had a professor of religion who’d put vocabulary words on our tests. It was a great clear big experience and I appreciated his efforts.
 

Audionut

Next Round Is On Me
Site Supporter
Fundement

1 : an underlying ground, theory, or principle. 2a : buttocks,. b : anus. 3 : the part of a land surface that has not been altered by human activities.
Oddly enough, there is a slang Spanish term for butt in Spanish; fundillo. (Fund might be the root word?)
 

Thermionics

Post Whore In Training
Site Supporter
New word learned tonight while reading about collecting Porsche 356s…

pe·nu·ri·ous
/pəˈn(y)o͝orēəs/

adjective
FORMAL

1. extremely poor; poverty-stricken.
"a penurious old tramp"

2. parsimonious; mean.
"a tight-fisted, penurious boss whose wage scale is well below other bandleaders"
As in penury, I'm guessing?

Two of my favorites from the vocab portion of the SAT circa 1986: badinage and persiflage

ˌbadnˈäZH - noun: humorous or witty banter
ˈpərsəˌfläZH - noun: light and slightly contemptuous mockery or banter

So sorta kindred spirits, one might say (or synonyms if you like)
 
Fika

/ˈfēkə/

noun
  1. (in Swedish custom) a break from activity during which people drink coffee, eat cakes or other light snacks, and relax with others.
    "comfortable seating areas provide the ideal space for working lunches or an afternoon fika"
  2. A moment to slow down and appreciate the little things in life
 

mfrench

Senior Member
I read this in 4th grade, and did a book report on it, including words of old english that I gleaned. The teacher gave me one of those, Huh!?!, looks, and an A on the report.
Just the title ought to hint at the content.

A Treatyse of Fysshynge wyth an Angle

Dame Juliana Berners, a fifteenth-century English nun, is often credited as the author of A Treatyse of Fysshynge wyth an Angle. This treatise was published in 1496, and for many years it was thought to be the earliest written work of fly-fishing instruction.
 

mfrench

Senior Member
Lets maketh some heads explode, shall we?

the first paragraph,....

¶ Here begynnyth the treatyse of fysshynge wyth an Angle."​

i017b.png

S


Alamon in his parablys sayth that a good spyryte makyth a flourynge aege / that is a fayre aege & a longe. And syth it is soo : I aske this questyon / . whi | che ben the meanes & the causes that enduce a man in to a mery spyryte. : Truly to my beste dyscrecōn it semeth good dysportes & honest gamys in whom a man Ioy | eth wythout ony repentannce after. Thenne folowyth it yt gode dysportes & honest games ben cause of mannys fayr aege & longe life. And therfore now woll I chose of foure good dispor | tes & honeste gamys / that is to wyte : of huntynge : hawkynge : fysshynge : & foulynge. The beste to my symple dyscrecōn why | che is fysshynge : callyd Anglynge wyth a rodde : and a lyne {2} and an hoke / And therof to treate as my symple wytte may suffyce : both for the sayd reason of Salamon and also for the reason that phisyk makyth in this wyse (¶ Si tibi deficiant medici medici tibi fiant : hec tria mens leta labor & moderata dieta.
¶ Ye shall vnderstonde that this is for to saye / Yf a man lacke leche or medicyne he shall make thre thynges his leche & medycyne : and he shall nede neuer no moo. The fyrste of theym is a mery thought. The seconde is labour not outrageo
ꝰ
. The thyr | de is dyete mesurable. Fyrste that yf a man wyll euer more be in mery thoughtes and haue a gladde spyryte : he must eschewe all contraryous company & all places of debate where he myghte haue ony occasyons of malencoly. And yf he woll haue a labour not outrageous he must thenne ordeyne him to his her | tys ease and pleasaunce wythout studye pensyfnesse or trauey | le a mery occupacyon whyche maye reioyce his herte : & in why | che his spyrytes may haue a mery delyte. And yf he woll be dy | etyd mesurably he must eschewe all places of ryotte whyche is cause of surfette and of syknesse / And he must drawe him to pla | ces of swete ayre and hungry : And ete nourishable meetes and dyffyable also.

in case you need more:
 
Last edited:

mfrench

Senior Member
Well, when making your own medicines, and using leeches is involved, I'm all in, and captivated.
Mery thoughts to you. And may your dyete be measureable.
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
Site Supporter
I gots nothin'.

Now, my son (the maths professor) -- he likes to grace his students with a word of the day.
'E's a good lad, 'e is.

I have posted this before, someplace. Maybe here, maybe elsewhere. Sorry, I am too lazy to check -- and not memorious* enough to recollect. ;)

_______________
* http://vigeland.caltech.edu/ist4/lectures/funes borges.pdf
 
The word "penultimate" is used a lot and it is very frequently misused. It means the next to the last not the really, really, really last item in a series.

There was a psychedelic band out of Boston called "Ultimate Spinach". They put out three albums during their heyday. Their middle album was called "Behold & See". It could have been correctly called "Ultimate Spinach's Penultimate Spinach" had they been prescient. I think I have played my copy of the album once. Time will tell if that was for the ultimate or penultimate time.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Lets maketh some heads explode, shall we?

the first paragraph,....

¶ Here begynnyth the treatyse of fysshynge wyth an Angle."​

i017b.png

S


Alamon in his parablys sayth that a good spyryte makyth a flourynge aege / that is a fayre aege & a longe. And syth it is soo : I aske this questyon / . whi | che ben the meanes & the causes that enduce a man in to a mery spyryte. : Truly to my beste dyscrecōn it semeth good dysportes & honest gamys in whom a man Ioy | eth wythout ony repentannce after. Thenne folowyth it yt gode dysportes & honest games ben cause of mannys fayr aege & longe life. And therfore now woll I chose of foure good dispor | tes & honeste gamys / that is to wyte : of huntynge : hawkynge : fysshynge : & foulynge. The beste to my symple dyscrecōn why | che is fysshynge : callyd Anglynge wyth a rodde : and a lyne {2} and an hoke / And therof to treate as my symple wytte may suffyce : both for the sayd reason of Salamon and also for the reason that phisyk makyth in this wyse (¶ Si tibi deficiant medici medici tibi fiant : hec tria mens leta labor & moderata dieta.
¶ Ye shall vnderstonde that this is for to saye / Yf a man lacke leche or medicyne he shall make thre thynges his leche & medycyne : and he shall nede neuer no moo. The fyrste of theym is a mery thought. The seconde is labour not outrageo
ꝰ
. The thyr | de is dyete mesurable. Fyrste that yf a man wyll euer more be in mery thoughtes and haue a gladde spyryte : he must eschewe all contraryous company & all places of debate where he myghte haue ony occasyons of malencoly. And yf he woll haue a labour not outrageous he must thenne ordeyne him to his her | tys ease and pleasaunce wythout studye pensyfnesse or trauey | le a mery occupacyon whyche maye reioyce his herte : & in why | che his spyrytes may haue a mery delyte. And yf he woll be dy | etyd mesurably he must eschewe all places of ryotte whyche is cause of surfette and of syknesse / And he must drawe him to pla | ces of swete ayre and hungry : And ete nourishable meetes and dyffyable also.

in case you need more:
I love earlier forms of English, oh my I do! When in high school I discovered that I could read and comprehend Chaucer's Middle English without too much difficulty I was off on a little life-long minor obsession with language and most of all the sound of it. Just another form of music...
 

mfrench

Senior Member
verisimilitude
noun [ U ]
formal
uk

/ˌver.ɪ.sɪˈmɪl.ɪ.tʃuːd/ us

/ˌver.ə.səˈmɪl.ə.tuːd/


the quality of seeming true or of having the appearance of being real:
She has included photographs in the book to lend verisimilitude to the story.
 
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