The measurement that matters most.

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
I swapped out turntables yesterday. I took the turntable in my vintage setup, and put it in my main setup. And put the one in my main setup and put it in the vintage setup. They're both vintage tables so, you know, things are still in order.

And at first I was intrigued by the change. There were differences. I started changing carts around, putting the ones that had been in use on the previous one on this one. It all sounded good enough. But something interesting was happening. Whereas I usually end up sitting on the couch in front of the stereo, I was ending up in other parts of the house, doing other things.

I had to go do something for work, and came home, and sat down again to listen to the turntable. I got to watching youtube videos and would mute the main system, to listen to the video. Usually I just listen through it if I'm sucked into a youtube rabbit hole.

A few minutes later I just turned the system off.

And so, despite everything being, on the face of it, good sounding..the turntables are getting swapped again. I'm all for the designers of my gear measuring everything this way and that. I, myself, only need one measurement. Does it keep me listening? I've had an untold number of things here that sounded great, and left me doing other things.

Which reminds me, the Yamaha YP-D8 stayed in my system longer than any turntable ever has. It's not even close to being the most expensive one I have. Nor is it the most talked about, and certainly it isn't the one that would impress people with its rarity or bragging-merit were they to come visit for a listen. I dug it out of the back of a used record store.

I should maybe go rescue it from the upstairs closet. You and me, buddy. You keep me listening.
 

mred

Senior Member
You petty much put it in perspective.
When I cant stop listening and get other sruff done, or can't keep reading what ever it is in front of me then....well you know, its right.
I put my 6c45p spud amps back my system last week, and have noticed some of the same, just not pulling me in as much.
 

Celt

Peanut Head
I know what you mean. Back when I had the belt driven Dual 506 with a AT-140LC, I thought it sounded pretty dang good. But, I rarely got engaged with the music. Then I got the SOTA Moonbeam and began modifying it with a different platter, feet and lastly, the cartridge.
Now when I put on an album, I'm stuck to my seat for the duration. It fully grabs my attention! And that's a good thing.
 

TubeHiFiNut

Administrator
My primary criteria for evaluating gear is how well that component allows me to connect emotionally with the music I love.

You describe the "symptom" of a component that fails to facilitate this connection to a "T" - listening to less music, turning the system off, find something else to do.
 

fiddlefye

Senior Member
Over the years I've tried all manner of combinations in every aspect of various systems. Some suck me in and won't let go, others seem to sound lovely but don't. As time goes by I've stopped shifting things about as much and spend more time just listening to music. The problem is that eternal battle with curiosity and I'm not sure that will ever leave.
 

TubeHiFiNut

Administrator
[Dammit, Jim] I am not an anatomist, but I think that's somewhere in the ol' cranium... and not in one's limbs, as the name seems to imply.

:p

View attachment 10742
Simplistic answer: The part of the brain where emotions, memories and motivation reside.

As an aside, advertisers have gotten very sophisticated at "connecting" to the Limbic portions of the brain ("Love, it's a Subaru"). ;)
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
As an aside, advertisers have gotten very sophisticated at "connecting" to the Limbic portions of the brain ("Love, it's a Subaru"). ;)
Yes you have your emotional branding move, and your more rational 'unique selling proposition." That said, I've had a Subaru and it was indeed love. I adored that car and still have it even though its not running. I even traded it in once, and then went back and got it.
 

TubeHiFiNut

Administrator
Yes you have your emotional branding move, and your more rational 'unique selling proposition." That said, I've had a Subaru and it was indeed love. I adored that car and still have it even though its not running. I even traded it in once, and then went back and got it.
I especially love the commercials with "The Barkleys". :)
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
Simplistic answer: The part of the brain where emotions, memories and motivation reside.

As an aside, advertisers have gotten very sophisticated at "connecting" to the Limbic portions of the brain ("Love, it's a Subaru"). ;)
Yup, I do know about the limbic system and the amygdala and the pineal gland and all that goopy brainey stuff. In fact, I think I went to high school with a girl named Amy Gdala.

I did buy a Subaru recently, come to think of it (and my limbic system, atrophied though it may be, plays a key role in memories...)

 
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