Today's Jazz Playlist

Olson_jr

Active Member
With guitarist Greg Tuohey of Romantic Funk fame.

By PETER HOETJES

So much regard is given to audio quality in the 21st century that there has become something of an obsession with "purity." A desire for music that has no digital manipulation, no computers layering sounds together. As co-band leaders, Jerome Sabbagh and Greg Tuohey resolved to attain this quality on No Filter by recording the album without edits or overdubs, directly to analog tape.

Everything the listener hears was captured in one take, on paper suggesting a live album recorded in a studio. Not that No Filter sounds like one. The album actually has a smooth, polished feel, never rough or raw. Audiophiles with high-end equipment will be happy, no doubt. Speaking about their decision to record the album in this traditional manner, Tuohey says that "[recording analog] is really about just trying to remove as much 'stuff' between the emotion that we're experiencing, and the emotion that you're hopefully experiencing as a listener."

No Filter, from start to finish, has a "less is more" philosophy backing it. Sabbagh's saxophone is understated throughout, and Tuohey seems content to play guitar to whatever effect the song requires, be it a sorrowful cry or menacing howl.



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Wntrmute2

Junior Member
With guitarist Greg Tuohey of Romantic Funk fame.

By PETER HOETJES

So much regard is given to audio quality in the 21st century that there has become something of an obsession with "purity." A desire for music that has no digital manipulation, no computers layering sounds together. As co-band leaders, Jerome Sabbagh and Greg Tuohey resolved to attain this quality on No Filter by recording the album without edits or overdubs, directly to analog tape.

Everything the listener hears was captured in one take, on paper suggesting a live album recorded in a studio. Not that No Filter sounds like one. The album actually has a smooth, polished feel, never rough or raw. Audiophiles with high-end equipment will be happy, no doubt. Speaking about their decision to record the album in this traditional manner, Tuohey says that "[recording analog] is really about just trying to remove as much 'stuff' between the emotion that we're experiencing, and the emotion that you're hopefully experiencing as a listener."

No Filter, from start to finish, has a "less is more" philosophy backing it. Sabbagh's saxophone is understated throughout, and Tuohey seems content to play guitar to whatever effect the song requires, be it a sorrowful cry or menacing howl.



View attachment 11393
I've been listening to this over and over. Very nice.
 
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