Tube guru's help me out here - Almarro 318B content.

I thought you wanted to keep the classic looks of the original? Sometimes i get confused.
 
I thought you wanted to keep the classic looks of the original? Sometimes i get confused.
Sometimes I'm highly confusing.

I think overall if I did stick with the hardwood, and maybe subbed teak or walnut on the sides (more my style) and kept the Maple on the front, used splines and had the same quality of finish... it doesn't necessarily have to have all the curves. They are subtle. But of course, the curves are a nice touch.
If we do make it a stand alone power amp... then it becomes even simpler cause the front panel wouldn't need the cutouts for the knobs.

But repair vs. replace is more up to whoever would take on the project.

- Woody
 
I think overall if I did stick with the hardwood, and maybe subbed teak or walnut on the sides (more my style) and kept the Maple on the front, used splines and had the same quality of finish... it doesn't necessarily have to have all the curves. They are subtle. But of course, the curves are a nice touch.
If we do make it a stand alone power amp... then it becomes even simpler cause the front panel wouldn't need the cutouts for the knobs.

But repair vs. replace is more up to whoever would take on the project.

- Woody
I agree with Luther on this; fabricating new sides is a LOT of work due to the intricate milling. Wrapping the sides that little bit onto the front requires removing the depth of wood the bulk of the length, cutting reliefs for the splines, back stretcher and side mounts. You'll also need a table saw, router and bits, drill, and sander plus a couple of hours for layout and the actual woodworkong and finishing; measure twice, cut once and all.
An alternate base could also be fabricated using less dramatic jointery, but that also would nix a lot of the Wow! factor and beauty, as the naked ugly duckling shows.
Honestly. I'd give it a listen now to see how it sounds, then look into the cap and pot issue. Until you get straight on the cap value, 0.22 vs. 0.022, I'd just toss some on hands or Daytons in there and not spend the $$ for the nicer caps until you figure out what you like. Paul_b seems to have a good handle on it, so I'd follow his lead and worry about the wooden cosmetics later.
Are there other owners here with 318s they can pop the hood on to see what they have installed vs what you have??? That would be helpful, as a prior owner could have mucked up the decimal point on the Jupiters.


318.jpeg
 
Ugh, I thought this might be your amp, but he used 0.47 Jupiters. Looks like there are options out there. It looks like the 0.47s are a common upgrade to the 0.22 and your 0.022s are a decimal error...

1682373006077.png

p64017547-4.jpg

Another with 0.47s...

1682372610793.png
 
Last edited:
Funny, I don't find it ugly at all, Sort of industrial chic. WE type stuff that is cool in that it works and has no pretense. George Wright built a lot of stuff like that I liked. Some nice tubes, add some vintage knobs and play away. Opinions like noses and assholes and all that.

So a can of green paint and a hammer and it would fit in?
 
Honestly. I'd give it a listen now to see how it sounds, then look into the cap and pot issue. Until you get straight on the cap value, 0.22 vs. 0.022, I'd just toss some on hands or Daytons in there and not spend the $$ for the nicer caps until you figure out what you like. Paul_b seems to have a good handle on it, so I'd follow his lead and worry about the wooden cosmetics later.
Are there other owners here with 318s they can pop the hood on to see what they have installed vs what you have??? That would be helpful, as a prior owner could have mucked up the decimal point on the Jupiters.

Ugh, I thought this might be your amp, but he used 0.47 Jupiters. Looks like there are options out there. It looks like the 0.47s are a common upgrade to the 0.22 and your 0.022s are a decimal error...

There are two pairs of caps that seem to be upgraded. The 0.47’s and then the 0.22’s. Per the schematic in the owners manual those are the correct values. Mine has the 0.47’s which are correct, but the 0.022’s are where the error seems to be. The hand marking on the caps is how they come from the factory… not an error from the previous owner.

Here are some pics from Parts Connexxion that are consistent with mine.

- Woody

IMG_7721.jpegIMG_7722.png
 
Here’s a thread I found that talks a little bit more about upgrades. I’m kinda a less is more guy and I really want to have this converted to a power amp only. Seems like it wouldn’t be that hard to REMOVE those bits… but still out of my ability range.


- Woody
 
I’ve always wondered if one could install a DPDT switch or jumpered RCAs inline on an integrated or receiver to create an isolated connection a functional Pre/Main switch. If one can determine the place where the preamplifier signal first encounters the power amp, a couple wires and RCAs could do the trick. You’d have to cut the wires/traces and route them through the proper switch, but it seems like it would be a simple mod and much easier than removing selector and volume switches while preserving the integrity of the original unit.

FWIW, I’ve always found the Pre/Main function attractive and it’s a big part of why my workbench receiver is an Onkyo TX-5000 as it eliminates one box on my test bench.
 
I’ve always wondered if one could install a DPDT switch or jumpered RCAs inline on an integrated or receiver to create an isolated connection a functional Pre/Main switch. If one can determine the place where the preamplifier signal first encounters the power amp, a couple wires and RCAs could do the trick. You’d have to cut the wires/traces and route them through the proper switch, but it seems like it would be a simple mod and much easier than removing selector and volume switches while preserving the integrity of the original unit.

FWIW, I’ve always found the Pre/Main function attractive and it’s a big part of why my workbench receiver is an Onkyo TX-5000 as it eliminates one box on my test bench.

I'm sure this could be done... but really, from what I've read, guys have noted marked improvement by changing or eliminating the volume pot on the 318B. I've also read a few instances where guys had issues with both... seems like keeping it as simple as possible would pay dividends, and it's for sure easier to eliminate things from the circuit then to modify/replace/add.

At this point I'm getting pretty settled on what I WANT done... just need to find someone with good skills willing to do the work for me and take my money.

- Woody
 
You will neuter the resale value if you start modifying the amp functionally. Turning up the volume pot all the way is a good way to mitigate its deleterious effects.

If you have the factory shipping box, you are welcome to send it my way. I have some ideas on how the wood base could be patched up, or I know a furniture repair guy who could have a whack at it (though his "whack" will probably be a $300 effort :/ )
 
You will neuter the resale value if you start modifying the amp functionally. Turning up the volume pot all the way is a good way to mitigate its deleterious effects.

If you have the factory shipping box, you are welcome to send it my way. I have some ideas on how the wood base could be patched up, or I know a furniture repair guy who could have a whack at it (though his "whack" will probably be a $300 effort :/ )

I don't have the factory shipping box, but I have a professional logistics company that I have used for years to build me packing cartons. I've had them pack and ship high-end stuff like EAR monoblocks, massive speakers (like Altec 817 cabinets at 170lbs each) and glass-faced Mac gear and much more without issue. So I can get it packed worry-free.

I bought this for less than half of the going rate for used 318's... so I'm cool spending a little bit to get it where I want. For years I've rolled the dice "hot-rodding" different pieces, and I have found that by documenting the changes - and having a sound rationale for it - I've actually come out fine when selling stuff. As long as I don't get stupid with my spending, I don't think I'll get hurt if it moves on... Given, it takes the right buyer, but the resale isn't too much of a concern.

As for the wood case, I talked with an acquaintance of mine who builds custom guitars last night. He is interested in the project and we might actually just keep the stock wood case as a template, and set it aside and just build something cool from scratch. The amp will be easier to ship without it anyway. I suspect some of the damage to the case is from shipping in it's past life anyway.

@paul_b Should I start a DM conversation with you? Or do you prefer email or a phone call? Let me know so we can discuss. Thank you for being open to taking on the project!

- Woody
 
Seems like you could round over or chamfer the rear corners of the wood and eliminate most or all of the damage and it could still look nice. The rear cross piece could be reproduced or fixed up. Doesn't seem too tough to spruce it up without spending a huge amount. The front looks to be in good shape. The small crack near the front of one side could be glued and clamped and likely refinished.
 
I was thinking on the back damage that you run it through a table saw at an angle to cut off the missing part, then glue on a block of cherry to replace what's missing.
 
Back
Top