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Thermionics

Post Whore In Training
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I think that the best thing to do -- and I am not being entirely facetious -- is to strip the guts out of any vintage component that really appeals to one aesthetically, and put a coupla of the really good, current production Class D amp modules inside of it.

Sorta like this (current production) McIntosh multichannel amp. ;)

View attachment 42928
View attachment 42930
View attachment 42929

source: McIntosh MI254 Power Amplifier Teardown

:)
Is this for reliability or sound quality?
 

JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
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I think that the best thing to do -- and I am not being entirely facetious -- is to strip the guts out of any vintage component that really appeals to one aesthetically, and put a coupla of the really good, current production Class D amp modules inside of it.

Sorta like this (current production) McIntosh multichannel amp. ;)

View attachment 42928
View attachment 42930
View attachment 42929

source: McIntosh MI254 Power Amplifier Teardown

:)
Alternately (alternatively?) to gutting, there are a few modern components that really embrace the aesthetic and ethos of vintage gear. Several of the Yamaha integrated amps, for example, the Luxman series that I run (L-505, 507, 509 etc), that new JBL integrated, and a few others. Or run something like that Onkyo A7 that Quirk Audio updated with several more modern parts in the circuit...so same, but different. Same but better. I don't know that I'd want to run a stock A7 now but this one here is fantastic and not worlds apart from the actually-new and much more expensive Luxman.

So I have recapped but otherwise stock (Citation), updated beyond just a recap but still vintage (Onkyo) and modern but looks vintage (Luxman). They each appeal to me for what they are.
 

mhardy6647

Señor Member
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That's what I was thinking.
First and foremost: day-in/day-out practicality, which I thought was @JohnVF's fundamental "issue" with vintage ss hardware.
I reckon all y'all've noticed I have a few vintage ss pieces :confused: :rolleyes: -- but I don't really use any of them.

The one ss piece I have been using lately -- a lot, truth be told -- isn't really vintage in the in which, e.g., erstwhile (or present) AK denizens would grasp the term (although certainly not modern either) and it has zero cachet, but it is up to the task of powering a pair of loudspeakers of modern design satisfyingly well.


DSC_0635 (2) by Mark Hardy, on Flickr

(not the T-7, although it's a satisfyingly nice tuner)
 

Doghouse Riley

Senior Junior Member
Is that Billy Eckstine?

That's what I was thinking.
First and foremost: day-in/day-out practicality, which I thought was @JohnVF's fundamental "issue" with vintage ss hardware.
I reckon all y'all've noticed I have a few vintage ss pieces :confused: :rolleyes: -- but I don't really use any of them.

The one ss piece I have been using lately -- a lot, truth be told -- isn't really vintage in the in which, e.g., erstwhile (or present) AK denizens would grasp the term (although certainly not modern either) and it has zero cachet, but it is up to the task of powering a pair of loudspeakers of modern design satisfyingly well.


DSC_0635 (2) by Mark Hardy, on Flickr

(not the T-7, although it's a satisfyingly nice tuner)


I've always liked Yamaha products, they are into everything.
As far as audio gear, I've a Yamaha Tyros 5 "leccy piano," sorry! I mean "work station" as they are now called. It replaced a Yamaha PSR 1000 that I'd had for twenty years and two other "Yammis" before that. I also have a Yamaha YTS62 tenor sax. All have worked faultlessly.
 
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JohnVF

Administrator
Staff member
Site Supporter
That's what I was thinking.
First and foremost: day-in/day-out practicality, which I thought was @JohnVF's fundamental "issue" with vintage ss hardware.
I reckon all y'all've noticed I have a few vintage ss pieces :confused: :rolleyes: -- but I don't really use any of them.

The one ss piece I have been using lately -- a lot, truth be told -- isn't really vintage in the in which, e.g., erstwhile (or present) AK denizens would grasp the term (although certainly not modern either) and it has zero cachet, but it is up to the task of powering a pair of loudspeakers of modern design satisfyingly well.


DSC_0635 (2) by Mark Hardy, on Flickr

(not the T-7, although it's a satisfyingly nice tuner)
My issue was actually sound quality vs the reputation of sound quality. I believe it was PM whose had all the reliability problems.
Which is why when my Onkyo said “hold my beer” with its not a total gutting of a rebuild, I was happily gobsmacked. My dream had come true. A vintage piece that sounded as good in real life as it did in my hopes and dreams!
 
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