Why Won't Roon Find My Raspberry Pi?

prime minister

Site Owner
Staff member
Just downloaded Roon for another try. While it installed ok, and seems to have found my music, my Raspberry Pi isn't showing up. Nor do I see an option to go looking for it. Roon has found my TV, and my Apple TV on my network, but not that. Audirvana found it right away.

Any thoughts?
 

prime minister

Site Owner
Staff member
BTW, I gotta say Apple has done something pretty magical with the speakers on my MacBook Pro 15. Damn, it sounds incredible!
 

Olson_jr

Active Member
If I remember correctly it needs to have the DAC connected and on for ROON to find it.

I assume that you do have the RoPieee software installed on the PI?
 

prime minister

Site Owner
Staff member
You assume incorrectly on the RoPieee software.

The Raspberry Pi is connected to the network and is connected to the day. Works perfectly through Audirvana.
 

Olson_jr

Active Member
I just played around with mine and ROON finds the PI without the DAC connected.

Might want to try disconnecting the PI from, and shutting down Audirvana. Rebooting the PI and then have ROON scan for new devices from the ROON Audio Set-Up page.


Screen Shot 2021-02-19 at 3.47.17 PM.png
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
This is stuff I do in my Raspberry Pi?
Using it's IP address, you bring up the Moode interface on any browser:

m ➞ Configure ➞ Audio ➞ Renderers ➞ Squeezelite ➞ On (SET)

Probably wouldn't hurt to turn off the UPnP Renderer while you're at it, some Renderer combos coexist nicely while others do not.

Then you need to enable Squeeze support in the Roon Core server.
 

prime minister

Site Owner
Staff member
Except, that after a few tries to get Room working, it turns out that my Raspberry pi has disappeared from the newtwork. Argh.
 
One thing that helps me here is that I use static DHCP for everything on the network. I don't know which brands of routers can support that, though. (Or to put it another way, I will never own a router that doesn't support it.) Static DHCP assigns the same IP address to the MAC address of a network device each time it connects. Way easier than messing around with assigning static IP addresses on devices. Not all routers call it static DHCP but, if there is a place to assign an IP address to a device's MAC address on the router, that's it.

I just wish I had an IP address for the car keys I keep misplacing...
 

airdronian

Radar Member
One thing that helps me here is that I use static DHCP for everything on the network. I don't know which brands of routers can support that, though. (Or to put it another way, I will never own a router that doesn't support it.) Static DHCP assigns the same IP address to the MAC address of a network device each time it connects. Way easier than messing around with assigning static IP addresses on devices. Not all routers call it static DHCP but, if there is a place to assign an IP address to a device's MAC address on the router, that's it.

I just wish I had an IP address for the car keys I keep misplacing...
DHCP reservation is another term. Probably more names for it out there depending on the router mfg.
 
DHCP reservation is another term. Probably more names for it out there depending on the router mfg.
I had to log in and find mine. Ubiquiti calls it Static Mapping.

1613840237505.png

"Leases" shows me the addresses that use DHCP. They make it easy by providing a button that lets me add it to static mapping:

1613840324194.png

I tend to group devices into IP address ranges, and keep a spreadsheet of the mappings. With the security cameras, I keep them in the range of 10.0.1.170 to 10.0.1.179, and that makes it easy to set them up in surveillance software or open up custom ports to view them remotely.

I can't own a "consumer" product that hides all this from me. I dislike losing that fine control over how my network operates, and not knowing what is happening with my data. But the drawback is that not everyone is up on networking, so I can't recommend it unconditionally. (I'll gladly help anyone configure one, though.)

This router does have the graphical web interface but it can also handle advanced configuration at a command line.

One thing I haven't done yet is configure the ETH1 port as a second WAN port--I want a spot to plug in my WiFi hotspot in the rare event our Internet service goes out.
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
DHCP reservation is another term. Probably more names for it out there depending on the router mfg.
That's what Apple calls it in the Airport Utility, simple to setup there, you just enter the MAC address and then restart the device, from there the IP stays persistent.
 

prime minister

Site Owner
Staff member
Been a bit under the weather the last few days, so other then rebooting my Pi I haven't been up to too much more. Well, the Raspberry Pi hasn't been up to too much more either, as it's been playing hide and go seek with my router since Friday afternoon. I'm not impressed. I've been basically locked into my listening chair since Thursday, and not having my Primary source available to me has not endeared it to me. To say the least.
 

MikeyFresh

Moderator
Staff member
Sounds very much just like last November. I've asked a number of times both then and now if you can see it using the Fing app, largely because I'm not familiar with any Eero interface.

If there is a solid reason why you don't want to try the Fing app, please just say that rather than ignore that aspect entirely.

I'll also reiterate, this is so damn unlikely to have anything to do with the RPi itself, nor the Moode software distro, both of which are proven and used by many, including right here on this forum. Can an SD card fail? Sure it can, but that too is unlikely.

I've used countless iterations of RPi 3B, 3B+, 3A+, ZeroW, and 4B along with Moode, Volumio, and Gentoo Player as the software distro, and my units have never vanished like that, so I think this is a DHCP lease expiration issue of some sort caused by the router, however that doesn't explain why a reboot doesn't restore things, it should.

Can you try making a temporary connection via Ethernet to see if that makes this unit show up? If so, then it's down to a WiFi issue of some kind.

Also, on reboot, if you look very carefully at the front panel LEDs you should be able to see the green CPU activity blinking after any reboot, but because the black plastic bottom of your case is only semi transparent, that green CPU LED can be hard to see if the ambient light in the room is bright, or even just in comparison to the much brighter red Power LED, which is unfortunately right next to it.

What you should be able to see easily enough are the Ethernet LEDs on the backside of the unit, if you plug an Ethernet cable in and reboot. If you do so, also ensure that the SD card hasn't somehow become semi-dislodged.
 
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